Echeveria in bloom

28 02 2008

Speaking of succulents, check out this really beautiful “succulent homage to Monet” on Sunset magazine’s website below. Looks like an easy project that mimics a lily pond without the real water. I know what my next garden project is going to be this season!

http://www.sunset.com/sunset/garden/article/0,20633,1130614,00.html

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Apricot tulips

27 02 2008

© Cindy Dyer. All Rights reserved.

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Aspens in Sedona

27 02 2008

Oak Creek Canyon in Sedona, Arizona…Oct. 20, my 30th “milestone” birthday…Dad climbing an apple tree and shaking apples down for our afternoon snack…perfect fall weather, perfect fall light…fallen red leaves in the dry river bed…vibrant yellow Aspens against a clear blue sky…by far my most memorable birthday, bar none. Thanks, Dad.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Golden girl

26 02 2008

This is a shot from a series I did of a friend many years ago. An image very similiar to this pose is the other shot that placed in the 2nd American Photo’s reader images contest (in the portrait/fashion category). They ran it horizontally by mistake, but I got published—so there were no complaints from me!

The hair is all Nicole’s (lucky gal!), and not a wig. We always called her Rapunzel (or Goldilocks) because of that gorgeous mane. She has beautiful big blue eyes, making it easy to focus on that critical area for portraits, and she was such a joy to photograph. And the “clothing” was simply satin draped into a “romance cover” type of gown. The lighting? A torchiere lamp (these were pre-studio-light-budget days, remember)…hence why the light is so golden. Hey, it works in this shot. The only thing missing is Fabio (or one of his contemporaries)!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Way out (south)west

25 02 2008

Here is just a small sampling of some of my southwest photos, scanned from 35mm Fuij film slides. Images cover Kodachrome Basin State Park in Cannonville, Utah (http://www.utah.com/stateparks/kodachrome.htm); Saquaro National Park in Tucson, Arizona (http://www.nps.gov/sagu/); White Sands National Monument, New Mexico (http://www.nps.gov/whsa/); Canyon de Chelly (and the White House Ruins) in Chinle, Arizona (http://www.nps.gov/cach/), and San Xavier del Bac Mission in Tucson, Arizona (http://www.sanxaviermission.org/)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Katydid nymph Scudderia on Osteospermum

24 02 2008

How’s that for a title? I photographed this tiny (less than 1/2 inch) little critter in my friend Nanda’s garden. After some research on my favorite “bug identifier site” (http://bugguide.net), I’ve discovered he/she is a Katydid nymph (Scudderia) and looks just like the ones posted in the links below:

http://bugguide.net/node/view/122958
http://bugguide.net/node/view/152833/bgimage

I posted the image on BugGuide.net and got a response (and confirmation about the identity) from John and Jane Balaban in less than two minutes! How’s that for service? Thanks!

And after further research, I’ve discovered that Nanda’s flower is an Osteospermum, hailing from South Africa. The scary thing is I actually had the word “Osteospermum” in my head when I went to research what kind of flower it was. I typed in the word (spelling it correctly the first time, yay!) and my hunch was verified. Apparently I’ve absorbed more information from my massive garden book collection than I had imagined.

To narrow it down further, I think it’s the “Peach Symphony” variety. And where did I find this? On the world’s No. 1 Osteospermum Resource site, of course! http://www.osteospermum.com/

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Wide open spaces

24 02 2008

I’ve rediscovered my 35mm slides from my many Southwest road trips after getting the slide scanner hooked back up. Once upon a time, I shot with a Nikon N90 or my “newer” F5 and Fuji slide film exclusively (ISO 50 or 100). I remember those days… hundreds of dollars worth of film on each trip, hauling at least 20-30 rolls in a cumbersome bag, trips to and from the photo lab, film processing costs, culling at the light table (toss, keep, toss, keep, um…maybe), putting everything in PrintFile slide sheets, and filing into binders. (Lucy, you got some scanning to do!) I spend more time at the computer than in those days, but I wouldn’t trade the new technology for anything!

Here are two of my favorite sky shots. The one on the left was taken somewhere in Arizona or Utah. The other was taken at the Petrified Forest National Park (http://www.nps.gov/pefo/) in Arizona. The skies out there always mesmerize me; as a result, I have tons of shots of cloud-dominant images in my archives! Now that I’m shooting 100% digital, I need to get back out there to shoot it all again with different equipment.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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