If it’s Thursday, this must be Bloedel.

21 09 2008

On our first full day of vacation, Sept. 11, Jim and Anne took us to the Bloedel Reserve, formerly the private residential estate of Prentice and Virginia Bloedel, now a public access 150-acre nature preserve and garden, and home to about three hundred kinds of trees. We were blessed with perfect walking weather while we toured the second growth forest, ponds, meadows and gardens. There are several gardens in the Bloedel Reserve: Japanese Garden, Moss Garden, Reflection Garden, The Woods, The Glen, the Waterfall Overlook, and the Bird Refuge. (Do check out the Bloedel Reserve website link listed above; you’ll find breathtaking photos shot overhead throughout the park and in different seasons!)

The Visitor Center is in the French country house on a bluff overlooking Port Madison Bay near Agate Pass. The Glen, home to perennials, bulbs, and wildflowers, also hosts more than 15,000 cyclamen plants, one of the largest plantings in the world. I especially liked the Japanese Garden with the beautiful Japanese maples beginning to change into their fall colors, and the brilliant green grass stepping stones surrounding the rock and sand Zen garden.

Row 1: A shot of the first solitary tree in the reserve next to a photo of Sue for scale
Row 2: A multitude of spores on the back of a fern plant
Row 3: Sue’s mom, Wanda, and her sister-in-law, Anne; a friendly wood sprite perched atop a tree stump; leaving the Japanese Garden
Row 4: A tiny frog Michael spotted in the Moss Garden; yellow yet-to-be-identified wildflowers
Row 5: Heather border at the main entrance
Row 6: Grass stepping stones and brilliant yellow foliage in the Japanese Garden
Row 7: The rock and sand Zen garden
Row 8: The tea house in the Japanese garden; another shot of the Zen garden
Row 9: Mischevious wood sprites peep through a large uprooted tree trunk
Row 10: Jim, Anne, Wanda, and Sue pose on the bluff at the Visitor Center overlooking Port Madison Bay
Row 11: Hydrangeas in bloom; geometric-patterned patio at the Visitor Center
Row 12: Sunlit foliage near The Woods

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

UPDATE: Well, lookee here! I posted this today and just received a nice and informative comment from the Executive Director of the Bloedel Reserve. Thanks, Richard!

“The yellow flowers are Kirengeshoma palmata — a plant from Japan known as Yellow Waxbells. It’s related to Hydrangea. The last photo looks like Magnolia, possibly Magnolia dawsoniana if it was the tree adjacent to the pond above the waterfall. Thanks for the kind comments…”

Richard A Brown, Executive Director, Bloedel Reserve

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22 09 2008
Richard A Brown

The yellow flowers are Kirengeshoma palmata — a plant from Japan known as Yellow Waxbells. It’s related to Hydrangea.

The last photo looks like Magnolia, possibly Magnolia dawsoniana if it was the tree adjacent to the pond above the waterfall.

Thanks for the kind comments…

Richard A Brown
Executive Director
Bloedel Reserve

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