Gentoo penguin at Port Lockroy, Antarctica

15 12 2009

Adult Gentoo penguin, photographed near the Port Lockroy Station A at Port Lockroy, a harbor on the Antarctica Peninsula of the British Antarctic Territory. Just a few years before my trip, Port Lockroy was renovated. Operated by the United Kingdom Antarctic Heritage Trust, it is now a museum and post office. Gentoo penguins were plentiful on almost every stop we made on this trip.

From Wikipedia: A major experiment on the island is to test the effect of tourism on penguins. Half the island is open to tourists, while the other half is reserved for penguins. So far, interestingly, the results show that tourism has a slight positive effect on penguins, possibly due to the presence of people being a deterrent to skuas—Antarctic birds that prey on penguin chicks and eggs.

Speaking of skuas—I did get some photos of those birds, but fervently hoped I wouldn’t witness one dragging off a lone chick. I’m happy to report no Gentoo chicks were skua-napped on my watch (not that I could have done anything about it—but still…) 35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.



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Whale bones at Whalers Bay, Deception Island

15 12 2009

Another slide scan from my Antarctica trip—converted to b&w (there isn’t much color in the original—overcast silvery-gray skies, murky water, black and white Gentoo and Chinstrap Penguins, and white whale bones). Perfect for a black and white conversion, I’d say!

Deception Island is an intermittently active volcano and the central crater of the island is a caldera. Whaler’s Bay is just inside the mouth of the harbor on the east side of Deception Island. It is the site of an old whaling station with a rendering plant, and a British Antarctic Survey base with an airplane hangar—both long since closed down. The base closed down in 1969, just after the last eruptions. During the Great Depression of the 1920s, whale oil prices dropped and the factory ships were abandoned. All that remains are rusty buildings and whale skeletons. The place was all at once rich in photographic opportunities but haunting and sad at the same time—all those big, beautiful intelligent creatures…gone.

During this stop, some of the more brave (or foolhardy?) passengers donned bathing suits and took a quick dip in an area where the geothermal heat had warmed the water. Once in, they looked pretty happy—it was the entrance and exit that had them moving pretty quickly! And no, I didn’t join them—I had a camera to protect, you know. 35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Aftermath of Mount St. Helens

15 12 2009

I realize this isn’t an award-winning shot, but I wanted to share this 35mm scan anyway. I shot this image of thousands of fallen trees—looking like so many pickup sticks—from a helicopter during a tour of Mount St. Helens around 1998 or so. The guide took us over the top of the crater of volcano (and yes, it’s still active—you can see continuous puffs of smoke from overhead) and through the valley. The devastation of May 18, 1980, was evident through all the new growth. The helicopter had a glass-bottom area (disconcerting and thrilling at the same time!), so I could see herds of elk migrating through the valley.

The volcano began a dome-building eruption in September 2004 after nearly two decades of relative inactivity. I just read on Wikipedia that the last activity was in January 2008. In July of the same year, scientists determined the eruption had ended after more than six months of no volcanic activity. Check out the USDA Forest Service’s VolcanoCam, with near real-time images of Mount St. Helens, taken from the Johnston Ridge Observatory. And if you’re curious about the current seismic activity—as well as other interesting information—check out this page here35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fence, shadow and sand

13 12 2009

Photo notes: Chincoteague Island, Virginia; Nikon N90s, Nikkor 35-70mm zoom, Fuji Velvia slide film, 35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Camilla in vintage lace dress with bow

13 12 2009

Photo notes: light source is Cam’s dining room window, image shot with my Nikon N2020, vaseline smeared on skylight filter for soft-focus effect. In the second shot, Cam had her back to the window and I used a piece of white cardboard (covered in aluminum foil, dull side up) to bounce the available light back into her face. 35mm slides scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Mount McKinley, Alaska

13 12 2009

I took a flightseeing tour from Talkeetna over the base camp of Mount McKinley when I was in Alaska in 2000. We flew over the longest glacier in Denali National Park—the 45-mile-long Kahiltna Glacier—and between McKinley’s two sister peaks—Mt. Hunter (14,500 ft.) and Mt. Moraker (17,400 feet). What an experience! I think this shot was made straight from the helicopter, right before we landed on a glacier. It was probably shot with my Nikon F5 and my 24mm wide angle lens. 35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All right reserved.





Big sky over Utah

13 12 2009

Photo notes: Nikon F5, Nikkor 24mm wide angle, Fuji Velvia slide film
35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.