The nerve!

25 04 2010

So about two weeks ago, I bought three ‘Champagne Bubbles’ poppy plants from Home Depot ($4 each, as I recall). I planted them in a sunny spot on the side border in our front yard (which gets both foot traffic and cars going by). Yesterday I noticed one plant, which had bloomed white poppies earlier in the week, was gone. GONE. The plant perp has stolen it and tamped down the ground so it would look like there was never a plant there. Ah, but there’s the rub—I always buy plants in odd numbers—1, 3, 5, etc. No way I would have bought two. I find it funny that they took the time to brush over the hole rather than leave evidence. Guess they figured with all the plants in my garden, I wouldn’t miss this little one. And they would be so wrong. Remember—photographic memory!

For some reason, this theft really irks me. I suppose I should be grateful they didn’t take all three. This is the first time in my 6+ years of gardening that I’ve noticed someone actually stole a plant from my garden. I suppose I should be thankful it hasn’t happened sooner. So now the thought occurs to me—should I take the remaining poppy plants and move them to the back yard where only I can enjoy them?

Have any of my fellow gardeners ever had plants stolen from their gardens?

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6 responses

25 04 2010
Mary Ellen Ryall

Stealing flowers. A resident of Shell Lake, Wisconsin, came by Happy Tonics store last year to report that people were walking through the Native Wildflower and Butterfly Garden picking the flowers meant for polllinators. She said a mother was with two girls and didn’t say a word to them. The eye witness did. We had to put up signs “Please don’t pick the flowers.” We also put a notice in the local paper to leave the flowers alone for the butterflies and bees.

I know how it feels. There will always be those who do not respect nature but what about those you never met who looked at the poppy and felt gladness of heart? Thank you for sharing the gift of beauty with others.

27 04 2010
Ann

Hi! I have never had a plant stolen from my yard, but I’ve had friends who have reported daffodils being chopped off just at peak bloom in spring. I think you should stick a sign in your yard so the perp knows you recognize they stole your plant. Even if it’s just a picture or sketch of the plant on a stick. Let them know they won’t get away with it! People like that irritate me… I could tie this to what’s going on in our government easily, like “you probably think Guam is likely to tip over too”… but that might make you more of a target in that area. Why don’t people understand the difference between right and wrong anymore?

27 04 2010
sue

I like the idea of a photo on a stick being placed “in memory” of the stolen plant. It lets the perp and others know that somone stole a plant. At first I thought maybe a squirrel dug it up but then I remembered they always leave a hole!

1 05 2010
thekingoftexas

Lines from a song by Little Jimmy Dickens immediately came to mind when I read about the Great Gladiola Grab by a person or persons unknown. You should print this sign and post it in the vacant spot:

To past and future plant thieves:

May the bird of paradise fly up your nose,
May an elephant caress you with his toes,
May your wife have runners in her hose,
May both your eyes be picked out by crows,
May the batteries in your —– explode.

Betcha can’t guess the word that the dashes replace—here’s a hint—the line is intended to include any female miscreant—oh, I suppose it could also give pause to male miscreants as well.

The first three lines are attributed to Little Jimmy Dickens. The last two lines are mine and are pending copyright.

You’re welcome—don’t mention it—I was pleased to help.

6 05 2010
Lis

Someone stole or ate my hyacinth bulbs this year. I was soooo looking forward to them blooming! I believe the miscreant was 4-legged.

7 05 2010
cindydyer

Hi Lis,

We’ve just surmised that rabbits are eating some of our newly-emerging hostas. I kept wondering why some of them were so late in coming up—we saw teeth marks on all the shoots and Michael sees a rabbit in our front yard fairly regularly. What to do? I got the “hare”brained idea of sprinkling aromatic used cat litter around the remaining hostas (they appear to only eat emerging baby hosta shoots, though), just in case they have an appetite for the fully grown plants! We’ll see how that works.

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