Fuji G617 archives: Bryce Canyon National Park

31 12 2010

On this trip, my cousin Bill and I hiked down into the canyon. Suffice it to say that it is so much easier to hike down into it than it is to hike back out of it. We saw people 20-30 years older than us passing (pathetic) us on the way back up to the rim. (Yeah, sure, just sprint on by…water? who needs extra water?…I’m fine…I’m not resting—I’m framing the scene for my next magnificent composition, yeah, that’s what I’m doing…I’m breathing heavy? Oh, that—I’m just so excited to be communing with nature!…don’t mind us, you with your little point-and-shoot, you…).

Oh, and if you’d like to replicate my experience (and you really should), be sure to carry one bag with a 35mm camera and oh, say, 4-5 lenses (with 20 rolls of Fuji film, filters and batteries)—and don’t forget the Fuji G617 on a tripod!

Be sure to click on the photo to enlarge it in a new window.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fuji G617 archives: Somewhere Caribbean-ish

31 12 2010

Sometime in the 90s…a relaxing cruise with my friend Norma…me lugging around this huge panoramic camera (in addition to all the Nikon 35mm equipment I never leave home without)…I really have no idea which island this was (they all blurred together on this trip—and no, I don’t drink at all (never have)—it was those tropical breezes that did me in)…it could be St. Lucia / St. Thomas / St. John / Virgin Gorda / St. Barts…just pick one!…Is this not the most beautiful palette of blues ever?

Be sure to click on the photo to enlarge it in a new window.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fuji G617 archives: World’s longest covered bridge

31 12 2010

My Nova Scotia friend John and I did a road trip to Cape Breton, Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island many years ago. One of our side trips was to the town of Hartland, New Brunswick to see the 1,282 foot Harland Covered Bridge, the longest covered bridge in the world. It was officially opened on July 4, 1901.

Be sure to click on the photo to enlarge it in a new window.

From the Harland, New Brunswick official website:

(http://www.town.hartland.nb.ca/html/bridge.htm):

A Wishing Bridge
The longest covered bridge in the world, at Hartland, New Brunswick, Canada, is a wishing bridge. When you enter the bridge, you make a wish, close your eyes, cross your fingers and hold your breath. Make certain you are not the driver! If you can do this for the entire length of the bridge, your wish is very likely to come true. This tradition is as old as the bridge. Sometimes it is varied by simply saying that you will have good luck if you can hold your breath until you have crossed the entire length of the bridge.

There is a sign at the entrance to the bridge with a note about it being a wishing bridge. Yes, I did try to hold my breath (and crossed my fingers) the entire jaunt over the bridge. It was not easy. Good thing they warn you to “make certain you are not the driver!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fuji G617 archives: Dead Horse Point State Park

31 12 2010

One of my favorite parks in Utah—Dead Horse Point State Park, adjacent to Canyonlands National Park, 2000 feet above the Colorado River.

Be sure to click on the photo to enlarge it in a new window.

From www.wikipedia.org: The park is so named because of its use as a natural corral by cowboys in the 19th century. The “dead horse” part of the name is that the corral was abandoned, but the horses did not leave the corral, even after the gate was left open, and died there. The park covers 5,362 acres of high desert at an altitude of 5,900 feet.

I also just learned that the area was the final scene of the 1991 film, Thelma & Louise.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Kristen in blue

31 12 2010

Mamiya 645J medium format negative; very minimal digital retouching (yes, her skin was that flawless, lucky girl). I did her hair and makeup and the “shrug” is just a few yards of textured satin fabric!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Mamiya 645J archives: Kristen

31 12 2010

I shot this photo (original was in color; I converted to b&w digitally) of Kristen back in the 90s, using my Mamiya 645J medium format camera and Kodak VPS film. I worked with Kristen when I was doing freelance graphic design and photography work for the Visiting Nurse Association, but lost track of her a few years later. She was just as sweet, funny and bright as she was pretty—and she was the consummate model, even with no experience. If you’re out there, Kristen, give me a holler!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Fuji G617 archives: Bryce Canyon

31 12 2010

Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah, photographed in the mid 90s (not sure exactly what year) with my Fuji G617 panoramic camera and Fuji RVP transparency film. The image height to width ratio is 3:1 and only four photographs can be made per 120 roll! The transparencies are 2.25″ x 6.5 inches long (6×17 cm). The angle of view with the fixed 105mm f/8 lens is about the same as my Nikon 24mm lens.

After my first trip (with my dad) to the Southwest, I was flipping through Joseph Meehan’s Panoramic Photography book and saw an image of Monument Valley shot with this camera. I knew then and there I had to have one, but certainly couldn’t afford the over $3,000 price tag for such a specialized camera. I found a brochure for one, tacked it over my computer, and vowed to work toward the lofty goal of acquiring one. I had wished fervently that someone would sell a used one. Voila!—a few weeks later one was advertised in the Washington Post for $1,900. The seller had used it just six times, photographing Little League group shots. It was in pristine condition and I was thrilled to become its second owner (he even reduced it to $1,800 just to reward me for my enthusiasm). I just saw one on eBay for that price and B&H Photo has a used one for $2,295.00. I’m happy to learn that this camera has held its value. Years later I was fortunate to meet Joseph Meehan at a photography seminar and had him autograph my copy of his book. Seeing these old images makes me want to go buy Fuji 120/220 transparency film (hmmm…how hard is that going to be to find in this digital age?) and lug my camera out to the great beyond!

Want to learn more about this attention-getting, shark-cage-surrounded, completely manual and mechanical film camera? Check out photographer Flemming Bo Jensen’s write-up on the Fuji G617 here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.