2022 Global Stamp graces the cover of Linn’s latest issue!

9 12 2022
My friend Jay Bigalke is the editor-in-chief of Linn’s Stamp News and just shared this cover with my 2022 global stamp on the latest issue of the magazine! Learn more about the publication at www.linns.com.




My 2022 Global Stamp Debuts!

14 03 2022

Today’s the day!

It’s the first day of issue of the 2022 Global Stamp (with my photo of an African daisy) in Kansas City, MO.

Look for it at your local post office, or you can order online here:

https://store.usps.com/store/results?Ntt=african%20daisy…

This round Global stamp can be used to mail a one-ounce letter to any country to which First-Class Mail International® service is available. As with all Global stamps, this stamp will have a postage value equivalent to the price of the single-piece First-Class Mail International first-ounce machinable letter in effect at the time of use.





Global Forever® Stamp for 2022!

12 01 2022
The USPS issued their very first Global Forever® stamp in 2013 (and it was a globe, appropriately). The USPS sends mail to over 190 countries, and guess whose photo of an African Daisy is going to be on the 2022 Global Forever® stamp? Drum roll, please…..

MINE!

I just got an email informing me that the news of the debut was released to the public today, so I can share the exciting news here!

USPS Reveals More Stamps for 2022: https://about.usps.com/…/0111-usps-reveals-more-stamps…

You can send 1 oz letters or postcards around the world with one Global Forever® stamp, which currently costs $1.30 and never expires, even if the postage price goes up. For large envelopes (flats) up to 15.994 oz, postage prices vary based on weight and destination.

The African Daisy stamp is being issued in self-adhesive panes of 10. This stamp will be released in Kansas City, MO, without a first-day-of-issue ceremony, on March 14. Sometimes the Postal Store will allow you to pre-order stamps from their website. I think they sometimes put issuances on pre-sale 30 days before issuance, so you might check out their site mid-February: usps.com/shop and then go to Stamps and search for African Daisy.

This is the 11th image I’ve had published as a Forever® stamp. Previously, I had images for: Ferns 2014, Water Lilies 2015 and Kenilworth Park (as part of the National Park Service 100th Anniversary 16-stamp panel) in 2016.





African daisy (Osteospermum)

31 03 2021

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. (iPhone 12 Pro Max, Camera+ 2 app in macro mode)





African daisy (Osteospermum)

31 03 2021

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. (iPhone 12 Pro Max, Camera+ 2 app in macro mode)





Carpenter bee on African daisy

17 08 2014

Carpenter bee on African daisy (Osteospermum)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Bee on Ganzania





Same time, last year: Hoverfly on African daisy

24 03 2012

Originally posted March 24, 2011

Hoverfly (Syrphidae), also known as Flower fly, on an African daisy (Dimorphotheca aurantiaca)

I found this image in my archives recently—photographed at Butchart Gardens on Vancouver Island north of Victoria, Canada three years ago. If you’re a garden lover or love to photograph gardens, put this place at the top of your “to visit” list. It is spectacular!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Osteospermum ‘Nasinga Cream’

26 08 2010

I think this is the ‘Nasinga Cream’ variety. Osteospermums are also known as African Daisy and Cape Daisy. Photographed at the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay, Maine 8.23.2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Same time, last year: White Spoon Osteospermum

24 03 2010

Originally posted March 23, 2008

This is an Osteospermum, also called African Daisy, Cape Daisy or Spoon Daisy (because of the spoon-shaped ray florets). I believe this might be the cultivar ‘William.’

Learn more about growing Osteospermums at www.osteospermum.com.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

longwoodwhitebloom





White Spoon Osteospermum

23 03 2009

This is an Osteospermum, also called African Daisy, Cape Daisy or Spoon Daisy (because of the spoon-shaped ray florets). I believe this might be the cultivar ‘William.’ 

Learn more about growing Osteospermums at www.osteospermum.com.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

longwoodwhitebloom