Lycoris radiata (Red Spider Lily)

11 09 2011

This lovely perennial, also known as Spider Lily and Naked Lily, is a member of the Amaryllis family and was introduced to the U.S. in 1854 by Captain William Roberts with just three bulbs he acquired in Japan. I photographed this bloom this afternoon at Green Spring Gardens.

Learn “How to Grow Your Garden Photography Skills” in my recent profile with Nikon here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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I’m looking for something in red…

9 03 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Amaryllis closeup

10 01 2011

I also photographed the Amaryllis blooms against the living room wall with a bit more available window light. It’s a decent shot, but I prefer the drama of the black background.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





In bloom today: Amaryllis

9 01 2011

My friend Karen gave me this Amaryllis plant a few months ago and it is almost completely in bloom today (three out of five blossoms have opened!). Amaryllis bulbs originated in the Andes mountains of South America. The bulbs are tender, so they can only be grown outdoors in Zones 9-11. They are one of the easiest bulbs to force indoors. The term ‘forcing’ refers to inducing a plant to grow (shoot, leaf and flower) ahead of its natural schedule and out of its natural environment.

The plant needs a well-lit and warm place to grow, but after the buds begin to open, move the plant to a cool and shady location to keep the blooms longer. When the flowers begin to wilt, cut them off at the top of the stalk. Cut the stalk just above the bulb when it begins to droop. Water and fertilize as normal until the leaves turn yellow, then cut the leaves back two inches from the top of the bulb. Remove the bulb and store in a cool dark place for a minimum of 6-8 weeks. You can repot the bulb after that and begin the whole (bloomin’) process all over again!

I took advantage of Target’s after-Christmas 75% off sale and have added another Amaryllis plant to the kitchen window sill (not blooming yet) and two pots with Paper White Narcissus bulbs. I grew Paper Whites two years ago and learned quite a bit about the process. My favorite Narcissus photograph and that experience can be seen on my blog here

Paper White stalks can get quite leggy and often require staking. I just learned how alcohol (vodka, tequila, whiskey or rubbing alcohol) can keep Paper Whites from falling over here.  

Isn’t it ironic that alcohol makes people fall over but plants stay upright?

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





X Amarcrinum

18 08 2010

X Amarcrinum is a hybrid between Amaryllis and Crinum; photographed at the Atlanta Botanical Garden, 8.15.2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.







Check out my zenfolio.com gallery!

1 05 2009

I’ve been working on putting the “cream of the crop” of my garden and landscape photos into one easy-to-navigate gallery. Eventually I’ll have the gallery set up to sell prints as well as stock photos, but in the interim, this is just a way to wrangle all of my web-viewing-only images into one gallery. I’ll be adding more images in the future. Currently there are 380 images in the Botanical Gallery. That should keep you plenty busy! If you’re a regular visitor to my blog, you’ll recognize many of the photos.

Once you click on the first link below, you can click “view all” at the bottom and see everything on one page, scrolling down as you go. If you click on an individual photo, it will enlarge and thumbnails for other images will show up on the side (as shown in the collage below). You can click on any of those to enlarge, or you can just launch the slide show in the second link below. I hope you enjoy the show!

Gallery:  http://cindydyer.zenfolio.com/p270076135

Slideshow: http://cindydyer.zenfolio.com/p270076135/slideshow

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Open a Zenfolio account with my referral code 8B9-BTJ-6G3 and save $5.00

zenfolio-gallery





In my heaven…

13 03 2008

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. www.cindydyer.com/GardenPhotos

More shots from this year’s Orchid show at the U.S. Botanic Garden.

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