Carousel horses

7 10 2012

I’m revisiting my Polaroid transfers made from some 35mm slide images I shot of the old carousel in San Antonio in Brackenridge Park. My dad told me the carousel was dismantled and sold years ago, so I went in search of information about the exact details and where it was moved. I found an article by Marian L. Martinello, a retired professor from UTSA College of Education and Human Development in San Antonio. Her article, “Inquiry as Detective Work: The Case of the Carousel,” describes this beautiful carousel in great detail and gives a bit of the background on its origin, so I thought it would be a perfect accompaniment to my Polaroid transfer photos. You can read it by clicking this link: Inquiry as Detective Work: The Case of the Carousel. I’ve contacted her to ask her if she knows what happened to the carousel and if she responds, I will share the results in a future post.

I sold enlargements of the carousel horses, along with some scenic transfer images, to Polaroid to hang in a gallery in their headquarters years ago (well before the company met its demise). I was contacted by someone involved in acquiring Polaroid-related images after he had seen my transfers on a website. My dad generously matted and framed all the pieces that were shipped to Polaroid. It wasn’t a huge windfall (I think I was paid about $700 or so for eight framed pieces, shipping included), but I was so honored to be part of the exhibit. Wonder what became of the images after the company shut down?

Want to learn more about the Polaroid transfer process? Click here to read a posting I wrote in October 2007, complete with links to various sites that offer tutorials and tips on creating transfers.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Polaroid transfers

21 10 2007

I was introduced to the Polaroid transfer process about 15 years ago. At the time, I was shooting 35mm film (not digital as I do today), and was always on the lookout for creative uses for my images. After much trial and error (and many $ spent tossing out rejects!), I got the hang of it and produced some really beautiful images. I sold some on eBay and they even caught the eye of an executive at Polaroid’s Digital Imaging headquarters. He purchased eight images, printed in 11×17 format on archival paper. My father matted and framed the images for me. That was quite a thrill to get that order! I haven’t done any in several years, and have been experimenting with recreating the look with Photoshop (it can be done, but nothing compares to the original process, in my opinion). I had a line of 12 greeting cards printed about 11 years ago and sold some in small boutiques; but I mostly used the cards as a self-promo and for gift giving. I had 2000 images of each image printed, so even after selling and giving away a few hundred boxes, I still have ample inventory in my store room! I made corrugated cardboard portfolios for the boxes sets and also sold them individually. If you’re not familiar with the Polaroid transfer process, check out the sites below.

Legend has it that when a photographer’s assistant at the Polaroid labs accidentally placed a Polacolor negative face down on a counter top, he had no idea a new photographic medium was being born. Returning later, he lifted the negative and found the image had been transferred to the countertop. Rumor has it that the head of the Polaroid corporation forbid any farther experimentation with the technique, but word about this new method leaked out to the photographic community.

http://www.art-e-zine.co.uk/image.html

http://users.frii.com/uliasz/photoart/lightscapes/about.htm

http://www.alternativephotography.com/process_imagetransfers.html

http://sarahwichlacz.com/?p=5

transfers.jpg

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.