HLM Cover Feature: HLAA Chapters

13 07 2017

Hearing Loss Magazine is published bimonthly by the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA). The July/August 2017 issue focuses on HLAA Chapters:

On the Cover by Dave Hutcheson

We really are on this journey together. Joan Kleinrock, HLAA’s very first national chapter coordinator, said it best, “Picture a wagon wheel from the Old West, with the hub of the wheel being the national office and the spokes of the wheel the local chapters. The wheel will not turn without the hub and spokes working together—supporting each other.”

Joan’s analogy couldn’t be more relevant. Every day, we embark on a journey to spread knowledge, provide resources and raise awareness of hearing loss. Our continued work and shared efforts get the wheels turning, and with each new accomplishment, both locally and nationally, we gain momentum toward reaching our final destination and goal.

For this issue’s cover we invited a few chapters near the national office in Bethesda, Maryland to join HLAA National Chapter Coordinator Erin Mirante on a little journey of our own. The sun was shining on the warm late spring day so we put the top down and got rolling. We asked our fellow travelers Russ Misheloff, Rachel Stevens and Veronica Davila Steele to share a few thoughts about their chapter’s journey. Now, won’t you join us?

Learn more about the Hearing Loss Association of America at hearingloss.org.

On the cover: (l to r, front seat) Russ Misheloff (D.C. Chapter), and HLAA National
Coordinator Erin Mirante; (l to r, back seat) Rachel Stevens (D.C. Chapter) and
Veronica Davila Steele (Prince George’s County Chapter), with her hearing dog Somalia
(“Sammie”).

Cover photo © Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

HLM JulyAug 2017 Cover





Seen & Heard: Cindy R. Jagger

10 01 2017

Cindy Jagger is our Seen & Heard profile in the January/February 2017 issue of Hearing Loss Magazine, published bimonthly by the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA). I met and photographed Cindy at HLAA Convention 2016 in Washington, D.C. this past June. Cindy is a member of the HLAA Diablo Valley Chapter in Walnut Creek, CA.

Join the Hearing Loss Association of America!
Do you have a hearing loss or know someone who does? Consider membership in the Hearing Loss Association of America. Student annual dues are $20, individual annual dues are $35, and family/couple annual dues are $45. Fees outside the U.S. are slightly higher. All memberships include discounts on hearing-related products, convention and special event early bird discounts, AVIS and Alamo car rental, and the award-winning Hearing Loss Magazine. Sign up for membership here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

sh-cindy-jagger

CINDY R. JAGGER

Suisun City, CA / Born January 16, 1948 in Washington, D.C.

DO YOU BELONG TO A CHAPTER? Yes, the HLAA Diablo Valley Chapter in Walnut Creek, California. HLAA is a passion of mine and I enjoy helping other people with hearing loss. I’ve been a chapter leader for the past 29 years and I have held many positions, including secretary, vice president, and president of the Diablo Valley Chapter. I also started a chapter in Solano County and served as the northern California state chapter coordinator for 11 years.

HOW DID YOU FIND OUT ABOUT HLAA? I got a flyer at work to attend a workshop with Sam Trychin, Ph.D., about how to cope with hearing loss. It was at the workshop I found out about HLAA. I joined in 1987, when it was called SHHH.

WHAT DO YOU LIKE BEST ABOUT HLAA CONVENTIONS? I like meeting people from all walks of life and remembering that people are not alone with their hearing loss.

MY HEARING LOSS… was discovered when I was three years old. I am not sure what caused it but the theory is that it was from a high fever I developed when I was six months old. I started wearing hearing aids when I was six and wore them for 43 years. I got my first cochlear implant (CI) in 1999 and second in 2008. My CIs are the most miraculous gift I have received to enhance my life!

FUNNY HEARING LOSS MOMENT…  After receiving my first cochlear implant, I was in a small meeting room alone and kept hearing “tick-tick-tick.” My first thought was that maybe there is a bomb under the table. When someone who was hearing arrived in the room, I asked what that “tick-tick-tick” sound was. “Oh, that is the clock on the wall,” said my friend.

MY FAVORITE LAZY DAY IS… reading a book on a rainy day. I also enjoy researching genealogy and doing crafts.

MY BEST ROAD TRIP EVER WAS… to Arizona in our new car and seeing three days of major league baseball spring training.

THE HARDEST THING I’VE EVER DONE WAS… earning my associates degree and continuing my education at a state college.

PEOPLE WOULD BE SURPRISED THAT I…  am the first CI recipient to climb the bridge at Sydney Harbor in Sydney, Australia.

MY LITTLE KNOWN TALENT IS… dancing.

I HAVE A WEAKNESS FOR…  sweets.

I HAVE A FEAR OF…  being stuck in a crowded elevator (it has happened twice!)

I COLLECT… angels and bears.

EVER MEET ANYONE FAMOUS?  Red Skelton, Nelson Rockefeller, Heather Whitestone

THE MOST RECENT SKILL I HAVE ACQUIRED IS…  interior design.

I LOVE THE SOUND OF…  ocean waves, rain drops, and music.

YOU JUST WON A $10 MILLION LOTTERY. WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? I give a gift to HLAA, pay bills, invest, remodel my house, and then travel the world.

FIVE PLACES I HAVE LIVED…  California, Japan, Maryland, Virginia, and Rhode Island

FIVE JOBS I HAVE HAD…  Third party collections (medical insurance for the Department of Defense), medical claims adjuster at an insurance company, travel voucher clerk, human resources clerk for a major contractor and engineering firm, and dance school teacher

I AM…  easygoing, loving, and positive.

MY FRIENDS WOULD SAY I AM…  fun, brave, and creative.

KINDEST THING ANYONE HAS DONE FOR ME… My husband, Jim, was so caring and loving during my cancer journey.

I WANT TO BE REMEMBERED… as an intellectual and loving person who had a thirst for knowledge and enjoyed life.

I love articles regarding new studies and new technologies regarding hearing loss in Hearing Loss Magazine.





Hearing Loss Magazine covers…who will grace the next issue?

29 06 2016

It has been an honor to photograph every one of these “cover models” for the Hearing Loss Magazine. Every story is different but they all deal with hearing loss and how these people thrive despite the challenges.

WEB HLM Covers to JulyAug2016 FLAT





Staff portraits for Hearing Loss Magazine’s special convention issue

4 03 2016

These are the interior shots I did of the HLAA staff members for our annual convention issue of Hearing Loss Magazine.

Staff Photos Collage





Spot the differences!

4 03 2016

Barbara Kelley (acting executive director of HLAA and editor-in-chief of Hearing Loss Magazine) came up with the idea of doing a “spot the differences” photo game for this issue. I had fun making changes to the original cover photo. Can you spot the 21 things I’ve changed in this photo?

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

SpotDifferences





Cover Shoot: Hearing Loss Magazine

4 03 2016

The latest issue of Hearing Loss Magazine was so much fun to design! I design and photograph for this bimonthly publication of the Hearing Loss Association of American (HLAA).

I photographed the HLAA staff at Union 206 Studio in Alexandria, VA in early February. With 14 people I had to have more room than my little studio would allow. I loved working with the cyclorama wall. I’m thinking about joining the studio as a member for those times I need to use a larger space. The fees are very reasonable and the three individual studios are nicely done. Special thanks to studio owner Charles Butler for his assistance in helping me set up for this complicated shoot.

The March/April issue is our annual convention issue. This year’s convention will be held in Washington, D.C., June 23-26 at the Washington Hilton. For more information, visit http://www.hearingloss.org/content/convention

We wanted to welcome attendees to the city, so we came up with the tourism concept for the cover. I also did individual shots of each employee so I could include their photos along with their tips on fun things to do and see in the area.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

HLM MarchApril 2016 Cover





Seen & Heard: Dave and Carrie Welter

29 05 2015

Dave and Carrie Welter are profiled in the Seen & Heard column of the May/June 2015 issue of Hearing Loss Magazine, published by the Hearing Loss Association of America. I photographed Dave and Carrie in Austin at Convention 2014.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Dave&Carrie

DAVE WELTER   Augusta, Georgia / Born August 7, 1936 in Lorain, Ohio

MY HEARING LOSS…I don’t have a significant hearing loss.

I FOUND OUT ABOUT HLAA…from my wife, Carrie.

SAGE ADVICE FOR SOMEONE NEWLY-DIAGNOSED WITH HEARING LOSS…Join a chapter of HLAA and learn all you can learn.

DISADVANTAGES OF HEARING LOSS…it separates you from the real world.

ADVANTAGES OF HEARING LOSS…You don’t have to sit through boring lectures.

BEST THING ABOUT HLAA…information available on the website

I LIKE BEING INVOLVED IN AN HLAA CHAPTER BECAUSE…I am able to help people with hearing loss communicate better.

FAVORITE CHILDHOOD MEMORY…driving a 1935 John Deere tractor when I was five

THE BEST GIFT…my wife

THE FIRST THING I BOUGHT WITH MY OWN MONEY WAS…a college education.

THE HARDEST THING I’VE EVER DONE WAS…say good-bye to my 16-year-old brother when he died.

HOBBIES…wood-turning, fishing, vehicle restoration, historical preservation, etc.

MY LITTLE KNOWN TALENT IS…turning wood trash into treasures.

I WISH I HAD A TALENT FOR…playing the piano.

I HAVE A WEAKNESS FOR…good beer.

I COLLECT…wood stumps, burls, walnut, cherry and any other beautiful wood.

IF I HAD TO DO IT ALL OVER, I WOULD…become more focused on my family.

YOU’VE WON A $1,000 SHOPPING SPREE TO A FAVORITE STORE…I would go to Highland Woodworking in Atlanta and buy woodworking tools.

FIVE JOBS I’VE HAD…mix mud for a plasterer, dig ditches for a plumber, lay brick, cut trees, and professor of cellular biology and anatomy

MY FRIENDS SAY I AM…can’t divulge that

BEST THING SINCE SLICED BREAD…my one-way wood lathe

I HAVE A FEAR OF…not getting my chores done.

EVER MEET ANYONE FAMOUS?…President Eisenhower

MY LONG-TERM GOAL IS…to live to 114.

I’M CRAVING…a Red Bull.

GREATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT?…taught a lot of students human anatomy

_________________________________________

CARRIE WELTER

Augusta, Georgia / Born August 21, 1942 in Statesboro (Bulloch County) Georgia

MY HEARING LOSS…I inherited it from my father. When I was in the fourth grade a hearing test revealed a mild hearing loss, although I probably had it from birth. In my mid-thirties I got my first hearing aids and now have bilateral cochlear implants.

I FOUND OUT ABOUT HLAA…I got a notice about a chapter meeting in nearby Aiken, South Carolina, with Pat Pennington as the organizer. I truly found my place.

SAGE ADVICE FOR SOMEONE NEWLY-DIAGNOSED WITH HEARING LOSS…Acknowledge it, accept it, join HLAA and do all you can to communicate with others.

DISADVANTAGES OF HEARING LOSS…misunderstandings, loss of communication

ADVANTAGES OF HEARING LOSS…selective hearing—great excuse!

BEST THING ABOUT HLAA…meeting others with hearing loss and their families and friends

I LIKE BEING INVOLVED IN AN HLAA CHAPTER BECAUSE…I can help people with hearing loss at the local level, one-on-one.

FAVORITE CHILDHOOD MEMORY…happy family gatherings eating boiled peanuts, drinking Coca-Cola® in the hot summer, swimming in the river and eating fried chicken on our river picnics

MY FIRST MEMORY OF BEING REALLY EXCITED WAS…learning to swim at the river at age four.

THE BEST GIFT…my cochlear implants

THE FIRST THING I BOUGHT WITH MY OWN MONEY WAS…a 1963 Comet.

I LOVE THE SOUND OF…birds, which I can now hear with my cochlear implants.

IN MY SPARE TIME…I never seem to have any

I MOST DEFINITELY AM NOT…an artist.

HOBBIES…scrapbooking, gardening and hiking

I WISH I HAD A TALENT FOR…playing the piano.

FAVORITE PLACE TO BE…the mountains with their splendor

FIVE PLACES I’VE LIVED…just Georgia

FIVE JOBS I’VE HAD…Christmas wrapper, 45-rpm vinyl record salesperson, library clerk, English teacher and school media specialist

MY MOTHER TAUGHT ME…about God.

MY FATHER TAUGHT ME…to be honest.

GET ANYTHING GOOD IN THE MAIL LATELY?…Hearing Loss Magazine

BEST THING SINCE SLICED BREAD…my cochlear implants

I HAVE A FEAR OF…the unknown.

I REALLY SHOULD…stop and smell the roses.

I SIMPLY CANNOT LIVE WITHOUT…my Dave.

THREE FAVORITE POSSESSIONS…my sight, my hearing, and my mind

MY MOTTO IS…serve others.

GREATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT? learning that I am not defined by my hearing loss—my hearing loss has made me stronger





Hayleigh Scott and Netegene Kirkpatrick: An Unlikely Friendship

14 11 2012

HLAA Members Hayleigh Scott and Netegene Kirkpatrick co-authored “An Unlikely Friendship” for the November/December 2012 issue of Hearing Loss Magazine, published bimonthly by the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA). I photographed the feature photo of them at HLAA’s annual conference this past June in Providence, R.I.

With the help of her mom, dad and sisters, Hayleigh started her own business, Hayleigh’s Cherished Charms, where she and her family create hearing aid scrunchies, tube twists, charms and patented clasp ideas for hearing aids and cochlear implants—allowing those with hearing loss to highlight their hearing instruments rather than hiding them. Ten percent of proceeds go to furthering hearing research and education of the hard of hearing and deaf community. Hayleigh first appeared in the January/February 20122 issue of Hearing Loss Magazine, and when Netegene read her story, she e-mailed her and they became fast friends.

Photo © Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

An Unlikely Friendship

by Hayleigh Scott and Netegene Fitzpatrick

Is there really a generation gap among people with hearing loss? We don’t think so. Here, 13-year-old Hayleigh Scott and 68-year-old Netagene Kirkpatrick share how they bridged the gap while a strong friendship grew. They joined forces to help reduce the stigma of hearing loss, spread awareness, and are having fun doing it.

Meeting Netagene by Hayleigh Scott

Netagene and I first met through my business website when Netagene e-mailed me saying she had read about me in Hearing Loss Magazine. She liked what I was doing and ordered some hearing aid charms. I thought it was great that Netagene was interested in being a model of my charms. I have many adult charm buyers but usually it’s the kids who send in pictures wearing their charms. Netagene was willing to put her photo on my website’s customer page. We became pen pals and I learned that she really feels the same way I do about hearing aids and glasses—we both want to have fun!

Netagene and I met in person at HLAA Convention 2011 in Washington, D.C. We talked for a while and got to know each other even better! Then we began sending each other little gifts. She even found pretty beads that she liked and she sent them to me with instructions on how she would like me to make them into charms for her.

One of the hardest things about having my own business is letting people know that I exist. Netagene has been so helpful in sharing what I do with others; she hands out my business cards, wears my charms, was interviewed by a newspaper in her home state of Alabama mentioning my business, and talks about the philosophy that we share. (We are not embarrassed to wear fancy glasses, so let’s make our hearing aids sparkle and shine!)

We kept in touch over the course of the next year updating each other with new things going on in our lives. Then Netagene’s mother died. I sent her a surprise pair of cross charms to wear to the funeral. We then saw each other this past June at the HLAA Convention in Providence, Rhode Island. It was so nice to get to see each other again! The last night of the convention we went out to dinner together and talked about the convention and lots of other things. Netagene is not just one of my favorite customers—she is one of my favorite people. Thank you HLAA for sharing what I do and for helping an unlikely friendship form.

Hayleigh Scott is an HLAA member and entrepreneur from Hollis, New Hampshire, and has exhibited at the last two HLAA Conventions. Her website is HayleighsCherishedCharms.com. Check out her Customer Photos page to see all the happy people, including Netagene.

Meeting Hayleigh by Netagene Kirkpatrick

There was an article about Hayleigh Scott and her business in the January/February 2011 Hearing Loss Magazine. I like to help others—in particular, young people—so I immediately looked up the website for Hayleigh’s Cherished Charms.

As the user of a long white cane (I am high-partial legally blind since 2003), I learned not to be ashamed of carrying one of those, of letting others see and know that I am imperfect. Some friends put a ribbon or some bells on their canes. One year, I taped a string of tiny battery-powered Christmas lights on my cane. Besides, people show off fancy eyeglasses that they wear, so why be ashamed to let others know that you need aids to see, to walk … and to hear!

That’s Hayleigh’s—and my—philosophy about wearing hearing aids. She had written my thoughts on her website, but she went a step farther. She did something about it when she was five years old at that! She started making charms. I went to her website and I immediately ordered the Dragonfly and the Red Cyclops Charms. (So what if I am 68 years old!)

When I got to the hotel in Crystal City for the HLAA Convention 2011, the first thing I did after checking into the hotel, even though I looked like something the cat had drug in (after a long train ride, plus dealing with the Washington, D.C. Metro), was to look for Hayleigh’s Cherished Charms in the Exhibit Hall. I met Hayleigh, her sisters Vienna and Sarah, and their mother Rachel. Sweet! Hayleigh and Rachel both are good about e-mailing their customers. I am not a cuddly, hugging kind of person, but that family is one that even I wanted to take in my arms and hug.

I learned their favorite colors and crocheted little bitty purses for all three girls. I’ve also bought little stuffed animals for them. I wish I could afford to buy more of the charms they make. I’ve mailed some strings of beads to Hayleigh and asked her to make me one pair and then use the rest to make others to sell.

When my mother passed away in 2011 at age 94, Hayleigh made a pair of cross hearing aid charms which arrived the day of my mother’s viewing. I had also told her about some of my past exploits, such as having been a DJ and having ridden a motorcycle. She also made a pair of hearing aid charms for me with a motorcycle on it! I didn’t ask for either pair so both were a surprise.

I keep my hair pulled back so that people can see my charms, and when someone mentions my “pretty earrings,” I take off one of my hearing aids to show them off. I keep a few of Hayleigh’s business cards on hand and give them away. I’ve shown my hearing aid charms to my audiologist and put some of Hayleigh’s cards in the waiting room of the hearing clinic.

I march to the tune of my own drummer and don’t like to be a cookie-cutter person; I like being a bit of a maverick—being unique. And, like Hayleigh and her family, I am proud of who I am and I’m not ashamed to let others know that just like I need aids to see, I also need aids to hear. Maybe amongst Hayleigh, HLAA and I, we can educate some people!

Netagene Kirkpatrick is an HLAA member from Birmingham, Alabama and has attended the last two HLAA Conventions.

Join the Hearing Loss Association of America!
Do you have a hearing loss or know someone who does? Consider membership in the Hearing Loss Association of America. Student annual dues are $20, individual annual dues are $35, and family/couple annual dues are $45. Fees outside the U.S. are slightly higher. All memberships include discounts on hearing-related products, convention and special event early bird discounts, AVIS and Alamo car rental, and the award-winning Hearing Loss Magazine. Sign up for membership here.





Hayleigh’s Cherished Charms

2 07 2011

Hayleigh’s Cherished Charms was one of the exhibitors at the annual Hearing Loss Association of America Convention, held last month in nearby Crystal City, Virginia.

HAYLEIGH’S ROCKY START
Before Hayleigh Scott was born, a sonogram revealed that she had a congenital diaphragmatic hernia, which displaced her organs. Her parents, Rachel and Andrew, were given options to terminate one baby, in-utero surgery, or to just “watch and wait.” They opted for the latter, with much prayer and support from family and friends. Her twin, Vienna, was healthy at birth; Hayleigh was not. She was in the ICU for two and half months and had to be quarantined for the first two years of her life. They noticed her hearing loss when she was 18 months old. She was diagnosed with severe-to-profound hearing loss and has been wearing hearing aids (and decorating them!) ever since.

AN ENTREPRENEUR IS BORN
When Hayleigh was five, she decided she wanted to show off her hearing aids with some “bling.” She started drawing sketches with her sisters and a few years later, their mom helped them make the designs into jewelry. With the help of her mother, father, twin sister Vienna and younger sister Sarah, Hayleigh turned this kitchen table venture into a full-fledged business, Hayleigh’s Cherished Charms. She encourages her customers to celebrate their uniqueness by embellishing their hearing aids and cochlear implants and not trying to hide them.

She and her two sisters make all the jewelry, which includes more than 50 hearing aid charms (see sample at left). They also create cochlear implant bling, bracelets, earrings and necklaces. Their newest creations are colorful and fun Tube Twists (shown at right) and Snake Tube Twists. And they’re not just for girly girls (and big girls)—they create charms for boys and tomboys, too! The charms are reasonably priced—from $10 to $25—and shipping on all orders is free in the U.S. and international shipping is just $5. Hayleigh is committed to giving back to the community she serves—ten percent of all proceeds are donated to furthering hearing research and education of the hard of hearing and deaf community.

A PASSION FOR BUSINESS
Her parents then applied for a provisional patent for her invention. A three-year process, this meant she couldn’t wear the charms, promote them or advertise them during that time. Now that’s what I call an extremely patient entrepreneur. Hayleigh and her sisters are so engaging and lively, and their enthusiasm for their products and their business is contagious! As a self-employed person for more than 20 years, I can relate to their joy and enthusiasm for their passion. Their booth was always busy and Vienna later told me that they did really well in their first time as exhibitors at an HLAA Convention.

Audiologist Douglas Beck conducted an interview last year with Hayleigh and her mother about Hayleigh’s hearing loss and her blossoming business for The American Academy of Audiology website. From that interview, I learned that Hayleigh and Vienna are “mirror twins.” I wasn’t familiar with that term until now. It means they have opposite identical features, like left versus right handedness and their hair parts on opposite sides. Read that interview transcript here. Author Maureen Doty Tomasula wrote about Hayleigh in her article, Sharing Her Special Charm, published in The Hearing Journal in September 2009.

SHARING A COMMON BOND
Hayleigh may not know this, but she shares an honor that I was privileged to receive a few years ago. She is the first place winner in the Student Category of the 2010 Oticon Focus on People Award. Congratulations, Hayleigh! I received first place in the Adult Category in 2008. Hearing Loss Magazine editor Barbara Kelley secretly nominated me for the award. Oticon flew all the winners and a guest to Denver for the ceremony, and I wrote about that amazing experience (thanks again, Barbara!) on my blog here.

To continue in the “six degrees of separation” vein, I met my friend and HLAA member Lynn Rousseau while in Denver at the Oticon Awards event. She was a first place award recipient in the Advocacy Category. We became fast friends and her life story was so interesting that I suggested to Barbara that we profile her in Hearing Loss Magazine. She made her cover feature debut in the May/June 2011 issue, which I wrote about here.

I photographed the entire Scott family (including Hayleigh’s adorable cherub of a brother, AJ) at the end of the Convention. Look for Hayleigh and her family in a future issue of Hearing Loss Magazine!

All photos (except product photos) © Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





The wedding party signs “I love you”

13 09 2010

I love this photo—had fun photographing this group yesterday afternoon by the koi pond at the Sayen House and Gardens in Hamilton, New Jersey. Left to right: Jennifer Thorpe, bridesmaid and Abbie’s closest friend; Brian Stewart, Todd’s brother-in-law; Patricia Strohmeyer, bridesmaid and Abbie’s cousin; Gregg Hlavacek, best man and groom’s brother; Natalie Gray, matron of honor and Abbie’s best friend; Todd and Abbie

How I Met Abbie and Patty
I design and produce the Hearing Loss Magazine, published by the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA). In early 2008, I was surfing the web looking for blogs by people with hearing loss. I stumbled upon Abbie’s blog, Chronicles of a Bionic Woman, and was immediately impressed—she’s a great writer and very funny. Her blog chronicled her hearing loss and subsequent cochlear implant surgeries. I asked my editor, Barbara Kelley, if we could profile her. I contacted Abbie to see if she would be interested, and she ended up driving from New Jersey to Virginia, bringing along her cousin Patty (bridesmaid shown above), for a cover photo session. Abbie wrote the article for the May/June 2008 issue of the magazine. You can see the results of the cover session (and download the article) on my blog here. Check out the glamour shots (which included playing with wigs!) I shot of Abbie and Patty after our cover session was done here. Because of her writing skills, Abbie was recruited as the official blogger for the 2009 HLAA convention in Nashville.

How I Met Jennifer
I found Jennifer Thorpe’s blog, Stereophonic Bionic, on Abbie’s blogroll and that’s how I became friends with Jen (bridesmaid shown above), whom I finally met in person at the HLAA’s 2009 convention in Nashville. While there, I photographed her with her lovely family for the cover of our July/August 2010 issue of the magazine. Read all about that issue and see the cover here. We were talking about her (wonderful) height (she kept taking her shoes off so she would tower too much over her fellow bridemaids) and she told me she’s the shorty in her family—her parents are 6’2″. I would love to have some of that height! 

As Fate Would Have It
So here we are, three years later, and Abbie is asking me to photograph her wedding. And to think this all came about simply from perusing blogs on the web! Isn’t technology just grand? Here’s a cool fact: Abbie became an Advanced Bionics (AB) mentor and mentored Gregg (the groom’s brother) when he got his cochlear implant. Then Todd decided he wanted to go the implant route and Gregg suggested he contact Abbie so she could mentor him through the process, too. During his best man’s toast, Gregg said that initially the three of them had an e-mail trifecta going, then after awhile he wasn’t included in the e-mails as much—which made him wonder what was up! Eventually, his suspicions were right—romance was blooming between Abbie and Todd! Again, all through e-mail—a bond was formed. They write about how they met on their wedding blog hereOnce again, isn’t technology just grand? 

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.