In the studio: Monica

28 02 2019

This image was captured on my iPhone 8Plus in portrait mode!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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In the studio: Monica

27 02 2019

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.  (Nikon D850, Nikkor 85mm)

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In the studio: Monica

26 02 2019

Just finished a really fun photo session with Monica. She works at an Apple store and when I saw her the first time, she had her hair pulled back and I thought to myself, “she sure would make a great photo subject.” The next time I saw her, she had her hair loose and natural like this and I was compelled to ask her to pose for me. I’m so thankful she did, because we just got some really great shots. She’s never modeled before, but she’s a natural at it. More shots to come! (Thanks for modeling for me, Monica. I’m so pleased with the results!) Nikon D850 and 85mm Nikkor lens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Laurel in white

2 09 2015

From my 35mm slide archives…the lovely Laurel, circa 90s

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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In the studio: Marisa

23 07 2013

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Marisa Modeling 4-up





Sylvia on a summer afternoon

11 08 2012

Who says your memory isn’t what it used to be when you get older? Sure, I don’t remember some things I’ve said or done years ago (when I’m reminded), but when I look at something I’ve photographed, no matter how long ago, I remember specific things. This is Sylvia, who was one of the “Four Muskateers”—a group of four best friends (from elementary school to high school and beyond) that included my younger sister, Kelley. All four girls were willing guinea pigs whenever I asked them to model for me. I was just starting out as a photographer and dreamed of becoming a fashion photographer when I got older.

I was about 19 years old at the time I shot this image. Sylvia was about 15 years old. She was wearing my high school graduation Gunne Sax dress (remember that brand?). My mother was having kidney stone surgery sometime before my high school graduation and dad was tasked with taking me shopping to find a dress for graduation (fun for him, I’m sure). I doubt he remembers taking me shopping, but I do and I just loved this dress so much. It was a very lightweight floral fabric in shades of taupe, brown and cream with lace trim, a lace neckline, and a stretchy smocked waist and I wore it well after graduation. I kept it and used it often in my self-assigned fashion shoots like the one here. The shawl in the photo was a very old baby blanket that I think my sister used for her baby doll’s crib when she was little.

We drove out into the country in Donna, Texas and found this stand of beautiful trees, dappled with late afternoon light. If my recollection is correct, I shot this with a Pentax K1000 35mm that my father bought me from Sears (yes, Sears). I had confiscated his Yashica 35mm in my senior year of high school to photograph a football game for the yearbook staff. I had never used a 35mm and I begged him to let me borrow it since no one else could cover the game that weekend. He made me promise not to break it, loan it out or leave it unattended. After the b&w contact sheets came back, the images were amazing. Every image perfectly cropped, actions stopped—sheer beginner’s luck, of course. I immediately fancied myself becoming a Sports Illustrated photographer (and I am so not a sports fan)! Accolades came flying in. I was smitten with photography from that point on. And no, he never got his camera back!

The next week I covered a game and my photos were horrible, but I was already floating on the cloud of success from my first go at it, so I persevered. So much so, that he bought me the Pentax K1000 35mm and a few lenses from Sears. Later, when I started my little photography business out of our den, he invested in a Mamiya 645J medium format camera, a few lenses and some accessories. I shot weddings, portraits and events with that camera. When I moved to the Northern Virginia area in 1985, I sold the Mamiya (and got a really good price for it!) and bought my first 35mm—a Nikon N2000, as I recall. This began my foray to becoming the Nikon snob I am today.

FYI—Sylvia was very photogenic and still is—I last saw her about nine years ago and she hasn’t aged a bit! Check out this closeup portrait I shot of her during the same session and blogged about here.

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UPDATE: It’s funny how things often do come around full circle. My complete lack of interest in sports still doesn’t keep me away from the subject. First, high school football photography, then decades later—photographing an NFL player and then a former NFL cheerleader! I was reminded of this unplanned journey by my friend Barbara in her comment below:

You forgot to mention your early days of photographing that high school football game eventually lead to a photo shoot at NFL’s Washington Redskins training camp in 2008 with a cover shot of Reed Doughty, safety, #37, for a feature article in Hearing Loss Magazine. Then, a photo shoot with a San Diego Charger’s “Charger Girl” cheerleader this year. So, you see, you don’t have to be a sports fan to get the great shots. You are an amazing talented girl!”

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Margot

14 07 2011

I was going through my archives to find stock photos for a client and found this photo of Margot that I had overlooked during my initial editing of the session in April 2010. I want to get her and her sister back into the studio for some shooting play time—they both take direction well and are very photogenic.

See more photos from that session in the links below:

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2010/04/17/margot/
https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2010/04/18/sisters/

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2010/04/17/hannah/

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2010/04/18/margot-again/

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2010/04/18/this-ones-for-karen/

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2010/04/18/and-finally/

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2010/04/17/karen/

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Attention, fellow photographers!

17 09 2010

WARNING: I’m going to brag about a DVD service I started subscribing to this year. No, I don’t get paid for this review, BUT if you decide to sign up, yours truly will qualify for free DVDs and other prizes simply for referring potential subscribers during their promo period. So, yes, I could possibly benefit, but not unless someone signs up! Truth is, I would blog about them anyway, because it has been such a great technical and business resource for me on the photography side of my business.

I discovered PhotoVision online earlier this year and decided to subscribe to their DVD series. It’s really a great price for what you get. Every other month I get a 2-hour DVD with tips on photographic styles and techniques, digital workflow, lighting and posing, Photoshop tips and tricks, marketing and sales strategies, and hardware and software reviews. Each DVD covers approximately 9-10 different photographers, studios, and a wide variety of topics.

It’s a really well-done series and makes me want to do more photography than I’m already doing (and win the lottery so I can build a dream studio, too!). They have more than 22,000 studios participating in the series and sponsors include: Canon, Westcott, Quantum, PPA, Nik Software, WHCC, Collages.net, WPPI, Animoto, Marathon Press, Radio Popper and Albums, Inc.

My favorite video are the ones where they visit photography studios (with amazing layouts and set-ups) and film the artist in action with real clients.

To give you an idea of topics, my latest DVD contains:

Lori Nordstrom: Garnering display (marketing)

Gary Box: Flattery is everything pt. 1 (photographing seniors)

Sana Antisdel: Tough guys (photographing senior boys)

Brian Demint: Shake it or leaf it (fashion photography)

Julie Klaasmeyer: Ginormica approach to window light (studio design & marketing) and One year and counting (window light children)

Beth Jansen: Better homes and babies, pt. 1 (location children)

Mike Fulton & Cody Clinton: Glimpses of Camelot (location bridal)

Kevin Jairaj: Maximizing your online opportunities (marketing)

Tim & Beverly Walden: Sales secrets for success (sales)

The series is geared toward all professional portrait, wedding, fashion, commercial and events photographers as well as photography students. Their normal subscription fee is $140, but if you click on the link below, you can get it for just $39 per year (which is what I paid when I signed up). Worth every penny, I say!

Use promo code: PVFAN http://fansof.photovisionvideo.com/Cindy/051113





Margot, b&w conversion

7 09 2010

Earlier this summer, I posted the color original of this portrait of a friend’s daughter. This one is on my top ten list of favorite portraits I’ve shot recently. When I shot film, I shot mostly Ilford b&w and loved the results I got with portrait shoots. I converted this image using b&w actions from a Totally Rad Actions set. Which image do you prefer—color or b&w—and why?

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Cover girls in the Lone Star State

25 12 2008

On Saturday, Sunday and Monday I photographed friends, family and neighbors as a holiday gift. As usual I overextended myself, but in the end it was worth it (I worked seven hours on Saturday, six hours on Sunday and about two hours on Monday). I was trying to shoot as many subjects as my sister could gather in order to save time, with multiple clothing changes, poses, hairstyles, makeup, etc. I got some great shots of each of my models—I hope they like them too. I brought out the wigs and most of my models were willing to try them on. Each row is one subject. In some cases you’ll notice them with their normal hair and then wearing a wig in the alternate photo.

There’s more to come after the holidays when I’ll have more time to prepare the other images. Special thanks to my models (in order of appearance in the collage) for their enthusiasm—my niece Lauren, Emily (Allison’s friend), Allison, Carole, Allison’s sister Stephanie, Kathy (Mom and Dad’s neighbor), Sandra, Martha and her daughter Corinne, Carey (mother to Stephanie and Allison), and Diana (Carole’s daughter).

Thanks to my trusty assistants. I couldn’t have pulled it off without them—my sister Debbie (set-up, make-up, hairstyling, jewelry adviser, cheerleader, and caterer!), her friend Sandra (pictured in the 7th row with the goddess up-do hairstyle) for holding the fan to create our beach windblown hair and bringing yummy leftovers from her party held the night before, brother-in-law Bill (provided the venue and extension cords for the Saturday night sessions), Lauren (for providing jewelry, tearing out inspiration shots from InStyle magazine prior to the sessions, and offering fashion advice), Dad (for creating a huge studio in the living room and letting us make a mess in it), and Mom (for making chocolate chip cookies).

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Tara

10 12 2008

Amazing what you can do with a blank wall, a bounce flash, a pretty teenager, her mother aiming a blowdryer at her from below, my sister serving as hairstylist, and some Photoshop creativity to jazz up the background! It was a quickie shoot last year to give Tara photos to create a modeling portfolio. I didn’t have much equipment with me so I worked with what we had on hand. In a pinch, I’ve used torchiere lamps as my major light source and dealt with the inherent color problems on the computer later. Just shows you what can be done with minimal resources.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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