Happy birthday, girl with the pearl earring!

16 12 2013

Originally posted 12.2009

The girl with the pearl earring is my longtime and very dear friend, Karen. This past Friday was her 29th birthday (again). The years have been very kind to her—she is just as lovely today as she was when I photographed her so many years ago. And now she has two very photogenic daughters for me to capture!

Photo notes: Fuji Velvia slide film, Nikon N2020 and my Nikkor 105mm lens, light from bedroom window, vaseline-smeared-on-skylight-filter softening trick

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fuji G617 archives: Bryce Canyon

31 12 2010

Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah, photographed in the mid 90s (not sure exactly what year) with my Fuji G617 panoramic camera and Fuji RVP transparency film. The image height to width ratio is 3:1 and only four photographs can be made per 120 roll! The transparencies are 2.25″ x 6.5 inches long (6×17 cm). The angle of view with the fixed 105mm f/8 lens is about the same as my Nikon 24mm lens.

After my first trip (with my dad) to the Southwest, I was flipping through Joseph Meehan’s Panoramic Photography book and saw an image of Monument Valley shot with this camera. I knew then and there I had to have one, but certainly couldn’t afford the over $3,000 price tag for such a specialized camera. I found a brochure for one, tacked it over my computer, and vowed to work toward the lofty goal of acquiring one. I had wished fervently that someone would sell a used one. Voila!—a few weeks later one was advertised in the Washington Post for $1,900. The seller had used it just six times, photographing Little League group shots. It was in pristine condition and I was thrilled to become its second owner (he even reduced it to $1,800 just to reward me for my enthusiasm). I just saw one on eBay for that price and B&H Photo has a used one for $2,295.00. I’m happy to learn that this camera has held its value. Years later I was fortunate to meet Joseph Meehan at a photography seminar and had him autograph my copy of his book. Seeing these old images makes me want to go buy Fuji 120/220 transparency film (hmmm…how hard is that going to be to find in this digital age?) and lug my camera out to the great beyond!

Want to learn more about this attention-getting, shark-cage-surrounded, completely manual and mechanical film camera? Check out photographer Flemming Bo Jensen’s write-up on the Fuji G617 here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Outta my way!

6 01 2010

This is one of my favorite Polaroid transfers. I shot the original image (Velvia transparency) one summer at the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, MD. While the original isn’t a bad image, it has more impact as a transfer, I think. This image was one of many I posted in a collage in October 2007 on this blog. See that posting here. I’ll post some more of those images enlarged and individually in the future. I’ve also run across some additional transfers I hadn’t scanned yet, so I’ll post those when I do.

FYI: I found this link here on photographer Holly Francis Dupré’s website. She has developed a comprehensive guide to creating Polaroid transfers that is free to download.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fence, shadow and sand

13 12 2009

Photo notes: Chincoteague Island, Virginia; Nikon N90s, Nikkor 35-70mm zoom, Fuji Velvia slide film, 35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Big sky over Utah

13 12 2009

Photo notes: Nikon F5, Nikkor 24mm wide angle, Fuji Velvia slide film
35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Girl with the pearl earring

12 12 2009

Can you think of a better title for this image? I thought not! This is my longtime dear friend Karen, circa 1986-87ish.

Photo notes: Fuji Velvia, Nikon N2020 and my 105mm lens, light from bedroom window, vaseline-smeared-on-skylight-filter softening trick

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Hallelujah light

12 12 2009

“Fingers of God” light (and a curtain of rain, I think!) over mountains near Aspen, Colorado (solo trip) and in sunset near Arches National Park, Utah (road trip with my friend Cammie). 35mm slides scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






ScanCafe delivers early!

11 12 2009

ScanCafe continues to impress me! I received an e-mail this morning at 8:21 a.m. stating that my order was ready for review. They were seven days early from their original date of December 18. They allow for up to 50% of your scans to be “deleted” and you’re not charged for those, believe it or not! I reviewed the files and decided not to delete any. I paid the remaining balance and less than 30 minutes later, I had a link to go download the .sit file with all the images. A DVD with the images will be sent with my original slides shortly. It took me a little over an hour to download a compressed file with 400 images—thank goodness for high speed Internet access.

Now begins the (most pleasant!) task of going through the images, processing in Photoshop (still have to teach myself Lightroom 2, though), and determining which ones are worthy of blog exposure. Some of these slides date back to the late 70s—obviously non-digital days—shot with various SLR film cameras ranging from my father’s Yashica (model unknown; he loaned it to me to shoot a high school football game and never got it back!), graduating to a Pentax K1000 purchased at Sears as a present from my dad, then on to my first Nikon—a Nikon N2020, then moving up to a Nikon N90s (followed by another N90s backup body), and ending with my ultimate dream camera (at the time)—a Nikon F5, which I still own.

Yes, I will still be shooting new stuff as my schedule permits and assignments arise, but I hope you’ll enjoy this nostalgic trip (with no particular chronological order) into the world of Kodachrome, Ektachrome and Fuji Velvia!

Photo note: I believe I shot this image of (Greater Flamingoes?) at the Gladys Porter Zoo in McAllen, Texas. I’ve always loved this composition, and it was one of my first images I selected to sent to ScanCafe. I did a 24×36 pastel/conté drawing of this image for my sister, Debbie, as a gift one Christmas many years ago. In fact, that drawing is still hanging in her foyer—unfortunately, it’s framed in an in-vogue-at-the-time (but certainly not now) shiny and modern metal frame—in hot pink (to match the flamingo legs, of course). Yowza! I should also mention that it is on the wall behind the front door when you enter, so it can’t easily gather a flock of admirers around it. Hey, I know it’s still there. Good on ya, Deboo.

LATE-BREAKING NEWS: In his recent comment, my father reminded me that I didn’t include one more film camera that was in my repertoire—my medium format Mamiya 645! Dad bought me this camera while I was still living in Texas, shooting portraits and weddings for extra cash. I had it for several years, then sold it when I moved to the Washington, D.C. area so I could buy my Nikon 2020 and various lenses to get back into shooting 35mm. I put an ad in the Washington Post and sold it for about $900, to the best of my recollection. Many years later, during one of my jaunts to Infinite Color (a local lab) to get slides processed, I started chatting with a photo techie guy who was manning the front counter that morning. One thing led to another and I discovered that he was the guy I had sold the camera to (about 8-9 years earlier). He was still using it at the time and loved it. He waxed rhapsodic over its virtues and I left the lab wishing I had kept the camera! I wonder if ScanCafe does medium 2-1/4 negatives and slides…hmmm…I sense a future project coming on!





From my 35mm slide archives: Southwest images

1 12 2009

After reading glowing reviews (by professional photographers, no less…and from my favorite graphic design guru, Chuck Green) about the scanning services of www.scancafe.com, I thought I’d give them a try. While I own a really nice Nikon Coolscan dedicated slide scanner, the thought of (eventually) scanning thousands of my old slides is daunting. I also wasn’t happy with the results I’ve been getting lately from random slide scans. Although it takes awhile to get the images scanned with this service (they outsource overseas), the price is phenomenal. I took advantage of their recent quicker turnaround and 25% off special this weekend and expect to have an online review of the images around the 18th of December. They return the slides with a DVD of the final scans. What’s really neat is—you can reject up to 50% of the images you send in. How they can profit from that, I don’t know, but it was enticement enough for me.

Photo 1: one of my favorite places in Arizona—Canyon de Chelly, in Chinle, Arizona. After a lengthy hike to the bottom of the canyon with my father, I photographed the White House Ruin (Photo 2). The White House Ruin was made famous (photographically) by Ansel Adams in his beautiful black and white image here.

Photo 3: Hovenweep National Monument, archeological site near the Utah-Colorado border. Remind me someday to tell you a funny story about how my dad and I discovered Hovenweep.

Photo 4: Kodachrome Basin State Park, near Cannonville, Utah. My cousin Bill and I stopped at this park on our Vegas-to-Lake-Powell adventure. How could I not stop at a park with the word “Kodachrome” in it? (Never mind that I shot almost exclusively with Fuji Velvia at the time!)

Photo 5: Petrified Forest National Park in the Painted Desert, Arizona. While we’re on the subject of the Petrified Forest, I just stumbled across an instant message discussion on AOL that I had with my dad after that road trip so many years ago.

Me: Remember how beautiful the light was when we visited Petrified Forest? Those stormy clouds coming in over the bright blue sky?

Dad: I remember it.

Me: And how you wanted to steal a piece of petrified wood but I told you that it wouldn’t look too swell for a U.S. Customs officer to get arrested for something like that?

Dad: So we bought some at the rip-off gift shop. Guess where they got ’em!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.