iPhoneography: Flower fly on Rudbeckia

15 08 2018

Flower fly (also known as Hover fly) on Rudbeckia bloom, against a backdrop of caladium leaves (iPhone 8Plus, Camera+ 2 app in macro mode)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Attachment-1.jpeg

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Flower Fly on French Marigold ‘Disco Red’

6 08 2013

Flower Fly or Hover Fly (Syrphidae) on French Marigold ‘Disco Red’ (Tagetes patula ‘Disco Red’), photographed at Green Spring Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Flower fly





Flower fly on Cranesbill (Geranium)

3 06 2012

Flower fly or Hover fly (Syrphidae) on Cranesbill; photographed at Brookside Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





And finally, Purplelicious Installment #4

6 03 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Last year I wrote a newsletter article for the FlowershopNetwork.com. Check out “A Passion for Purple Flowers” here.





Hardly seems fair winning my own prize…

6 05 2008

I remembered photographing this bug about two years ago and sharing it with my Garden Club members and a few friends. I went through my e-mail archives and found it this evening! Here’s the e-mail thread:

7/7/2006: Hey everyone…Remember when I mentioned that I thought that bug might be a bee? I was hesitant and apparently rightly so! Thanks to my friend Jeff, I have been enlightened on one of the differences between bees and flies…thanks, Jeff! Be sure to click on the link he sent…it matches my bug exactly! Here was his letter below. — Cindy

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Cin, It is a type of fly, Order Diptera. Like all flies, it has two wings. Most other flying insects — bees, wasps, even most beetles, have four. I would say that your specimen is a Flower Fly or Hoverfly, family Syrphidae, species Toxomerus.
http://www.pbase.com/lejun/image/29589768
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From my Dad 7/7/2006
Oh, I knew immediately that it was a Flower Fly of the order Diptera, and that it was of the family Syrphidae, but I was uncertain of the exact species so I just let it slide — your misclassification was harmless and, as you know, I dislike correcting people in such matters (whether bee, fly or flea, it was a gorgeous photo).

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Great. Now everyone on two coasts knows I’m a nerd. A little bit of Mr. Science goes a long way. — Jeff
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No, now everyone knows I have a terribly, terribly, TERRIBLY brilliant, curious, mentally acute, resourceful, wise, erudite friend and one is judged by the company one keeps….so it’s a win-win situation for me! And remember, it’s all about me! In fact, I put your entire name because there was another Jeff in the e-mail and although he is also very bright, I did not want to give him credit where credit was not due. The proper nerd has been publicly thanked. Remember, I’ve been educating these Weedettes for over two years on everything I know and everything I research…..they’re used to MY nerdiness….I just brought company with me this time! — Cindy

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I photographed this same fly (okay, not THIS same fly, but a distant relative) last summer. I knew it looked familiar. Here are closeups of one on a coneflower. Learn more about this very beneficial insect: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoverfly

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.   www.cindydyer.com/GardenPhotos