Lilies by the fence

10 06 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Lilytopia 2011

28 05 2011

From the Lilytopia signage:

About the Designer: This breathtaking exhibition of lilies was created by Dorien van den Berg, the famed and world-inspired designer from The Netherlands. Dorien was born in The Netherlands and at the age of fourteen was introduced to flower exhibition at the renowned Keukenhof, The Netherlands. She was inspired by these shows and focused her studies on horticulture. She traveled the world and learned different flower arranging styles in Brussels, Vienna, America, Japan and other countries. Years of experiencing different cultures and learning new flower arranging styles have made Dorien what she is and what she creates today. For Longwood Gardens, she carefully selected materials and lily cultivars that create a design that balances color, texture and form to transform the Conservatory into a true LilyTopia.

Lilytopia 2011 showcases over 11,000 cut lilies and 1,500 calla lilies. Learn more about Lilytopia behind-the-scenes in the following links:

http://www.marthastewart.com/270900/lily-glossary?video_id=0

https://longwoodgardens.wordpress.com/2011/05/16/countdown-to-lilytopia-2011/

Photo © Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Blooming in my garden today: Passion Flower

13 07 2010

I’ve been tending to this same Passion Flower plant since 2006—so this makes the fifth year I’ve been able to over-winter it in my studio office! As I was photographing this flower, I heard a creaking, croaking sound. Could there be a new frog taking up residence in our teeny, tiny pond again? I couldn’t find him, but I certainly could hear him! I’m crossing my fingers in hopes that I can get a shot of this new garden inhabitant.

Also blooming in the garden today: 22 bright pink and green downward facing lilies (they’re stunning en masse!), three huge white Casa Blanca Lilies, large clusters of Purple Coneflowers, two groups of Shasta Daisies, and one beautiful deep purple and white Dahlia. I’ll get some photographs of those this afternoon.

Passionate about Passion Flowers? Check out the links below to see more images shot in my garden over the past few years.

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/08/26/its-about-time/

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/06/22/backyard-blooms/

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/06/21/meanwhile-in-the-garden/

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/07/28/lady-margaret/

For more information on passion flowers:

Passiflora Online is a comprehensive website with growing tips, FAQs, plant ID, hybrid and species images, pollinators, and much more.

Plants in Motion has videos of a passion flower in bloom and also short clips of bees visiting the flowers.

Tradewinds Fruit has a great database of passion flower blossoms. Click on the “related species” section on the left of the site to see a wide variety of passion flower plants.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Morning blooms

8 06 2010

Lovely and lusciously luminous lilies in sweet, succulent, seductively spectacular shades of sherbet glisten in my grand and gloriously gorgeous green garden (this sentence created solely to amuse my alliteration-loving father)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Parents, plants and partying

22 03 2010

Best parents in the world, shown at right. It’s true. It’s really, really true. Wouldn’t trade ’em for nuthin’. Check out the latest photos I’ve posted on our wedding blog here.

Speaking of blogs…check out my dad’s blog, The King of Texas. He waxes rhapsodic about his family, revisits his childhood (with amazing recall for details), comments on current events (political, celebrity, media and more), and aims to right grammatical wrongs (one visitor at a time) with his occasional lessons on the subject. Check out his archives for some of his essays. I introduced him to blogging almost a year ago and he has become a prolific poster. He has always loved to write and it shows in his lengthy and detailed essays. I just knew it would be a great creative outlet for him. I realize I’ve created a monster, but I am so proud of my grasshopper! Whether you agree or disagree on any particular posting, he welcomes feedback of any kind (but thrives on kudos in particular), so don’t hesitate to comment—he always responds.

Out in the garden…my hellebores, snowdrops and crocus plants are in bloom—after a long, cold, way-too-much-snow winter. I predict some flower photos appearing on the blog shortly. Michael and I cleaned up most of the front yard (gathering six bags of debris!) on Thursday and my friend Tom helped me with a good portion of the back yard garden on Friday. There are lots of empty gaps in the garden this year, so there will definitely be some restructuring of the various beds in an effort to refresh things. I bought a slew of bulbs at Home Depot last night for the front yard garden (liatris, crocosmia, tigridia and lilies). I’m waiting to plant when I’m sure there’s no danger of frost! I also want to try out some new perennial choices so I’ll have some new specimens to photograph this year.

Speaking of flower photography…check out my buddy Ed Vatza’s stunning photos here of the elusive Himalayan Blue Poppy, which he photographed at Longwood Gardens recently. Wish these beauties weren’t so temperamental—they would be in my garden in a heartbeat if they were easier to grow!

And on to the partying…Nanda, one of my Garden Club Weedettes, hosted a knitting party late this afternoon (with wonderful Indian munchies). Yours truly was introduced to knitting today. Boy, was that ever a challenge! I think I’ve gotten the hang of it (sorta/kinda), but it’s definitely seems harder than my basic crochet skills. I’ll post a few photos of my newfound knitting friends and my work-in-progress (I think it’s a scarf—hard to tell at this point!) shortly. Sigh…as if I needed another hobby.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





It’s a jungle out there

28 05 2009

Shot of our front yard garden taken this afternoon…

Just past bloom: White & purple Bearded Iris and Purple Sensation Allium 

Debuting now: Beard’s Tongue, Catmint, Veronica Speedwell, Creeping Thyme, Sweet William, Penstemon, Rose Campion (blush pink-white and bright pink varieties), Hellebores, Sedum, Yellow Yarrow, Nasturtium, White Dianthus, Pink Phlox, Hosta flowers, Ageratum, Evening Primrose ‘Lemon Drop’, Strawflower, Geraniums 

Very-soon-to-bloom: Globe Thistle, Lavender (various), Coreopsis, Tickseed, Lilies (various) and Salvia

And later in the seasonButterfly bush (pink, yellow, purple varieties), Coneflower (various varieties)

Platycodon Balloon Flower (purple and white varieties), Shasta Daisies, Black-eyed Susan, Monarda Bee Balm, Lamb’s Ear, Morning Glory ‘Heavenly Blue’, Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, Maximilian sunflower

Ha! And this is just the list of plants in the front yard. Proof enough that I’m a gardener obsessed.

Got a question for my fellow gardeners…what is the weed (looks a lot like the tops of celery plants or almost cilantro-looking leaf) that is taking over my entire garden in spades? Why have I not noticed this prolific pest in previous years? Is it a new invasive? Do I need to photograph it for identification?
  
© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

InBloom5282009


 





Check out my zenfolio.com gallery!

1 05 2009

I’ve been working on putting the “cream of the crop” of my garden and landscape photos into one easy-to-navigate gallery. Eventually I’ll have the gallery set up to sell prints as well as stock photos, but in the interim, this is just a way to wrangle all of my web-viewing-only images into one gallery. I’ll be adding more images in the future. Currently there are 380 images in the Botanical Gallery. That should keep you plenty busy! If you’re a regular visitor to my blog, you’ll recognize many of the photos.

Once you click on the first link below, you can click “view all” at the bottom and see everything on one page, scrolling down as you go. If you click on an individual photo, it will enlarge and thumbnails for other images will show up on the side (as shown in the collage below). You can click on any of those to enlarge, or you can just launch the slide show in the second link below. I hope you enjoy the show!

Gallery:  http://cindydyer.zenfolio.com/p270076135

Slideshow: http://cindydyer.zenfolio.com/p270076135/slideshow

———————————————–
Open a Zenfolio account with my referral code 8B9-BTJ-6G3 and save $5.00

zenfolio-gallery





“Four by 4” at Gallery West

13 01 2009

FourXFour LogoOn Saturday evening Michael, Regina, Karen, and Joe and I attended the opening reception of the “Four by 4” show at Gallery West on King Street. Regina’s husband, Jeff, was one of the four artists in this collaborative exhibit. Founded in 1979, Gallery West is an artist’s cooperative gallery located at 1213 King Street in Alexandria, Virginia. The “Four by 4” show runs from January 7 through February 1. All photography © Cindy Dyer.

gallery-photo-1aa

The Four x 4 artists, left to right: Parisa Tirna, Susan La Mont, Karen Waltermire, and Jeff Evans.

From the Gallery West website:

PARISA TIRNA is an emerging self taught landscape artist whose contemplative canvases evoke the classic landscapes of the 19th century. This is her first gallery show. See more of Parisa’s work at www.parisaart.blogspot.com and on the Gallery West website.

SUSAN LA MONT has a B.F.A. in art from Pratt Institute, a M.A. in illustration from Syracuse University, and a Doctor of Arts from George Mason University in higher education with a focus on art. She has won several awards and her sharply drawn realistic paintings can be found in numerous private and corporate collections. See more of Susan’s work at www.susanlamont.com and on the Gallery West website. You can watch her work on one of her paintings in a video I found here on the Artistic Type website.

KAREN WALTERMIRE studied art for several years before striking out on her own to develop a unique whimsical drawing style. She has been in several group shows in the D.C. area and was previously a member of Spectrum Gallery. See more of Karen’s work at www.inkonly.blogspot.com and on the Gallery West website.

JEFFERSON EVANS is a self taught photographer who focuses on travel, nature and fine art images. He is a member of the Northern Virginia Photographic Society and the Springfield Art Guild. His work has been in numerous juried shows, exhibitions and publications. See more of his work at www.evansimagesandart.com, on the Springfield Art Guild‘s website, and on the Gallery West website. Jeff also contributed his beautiful Monarch chrysalis photographs for a poster I designed for the Happy Tonics Monarch Butterfly Habitat in Shell Lake, Wisconsin. You can see that poster here. The “Monarch emerging” photos are also used in the nameplate of the quarterly newsletter, Butterflies & Gardens, that I design and produce for Happy Tonics.

gallery-west-8

Parisa started painting as a non-objective abstract painter until her first landscape experiment showed her the rewarding spirit of nature and brought her to the world of landscape art. Her paintings are inspired by American East Coast lushness of trees and fields of wildflowers and create a feeling of open space and reverie.

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Susan La Mont’s narrative realistic style connects with viewers and encourages them to examine the details and speculate about the scenes she portrays. Susan’s work has been acquired by over 30 private and corporate collections.

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Karen Waltermire draw portraits of imaginary people in pen and ink based on people she sees, architecture, and her imagination. Her style is modern, edgy and spirited—with a sense of humor thrown in.

gallery-photo-1a

Travel throughout Europe, as well as his wife’s love of gardening, has greatly influenced Jefferson Evans’ photographic eye. His images capture everything from broad vistas to lively street scenes to dewdrops on a single blade of grass. His subjects range from floral ephemeral to human transitional—from one moment to the next—from vivid colors to classic monochrome to evocative infrared. Above: Jeff and his wife, Regina

gallery-west-9

Above: Jeff with Leda (a friend from our neighborhood and also one of my “Weedettes” in the Garden Club) and Leda’s friend, Anna (right), who coincidentally was one of Michael’s co-workers when he worked for the City of Alexandria. Anna worked as a graphic designer for the City and is now a freelance photographer.

gallery-photo-2

And from Jeff’s ‘hood, a rousing show of support—Michael, Regina, Karen and Joe. Some other neighbors and friends in attendance were Tom, Holly, Mike, Janet, Bill, Jeannie and Dan—and other supporters I met but whose names escape me. Michael, Tom, Holly, Karen, and Joe and I gathered for a wonderful Italian dinner across the street at Pines of Florence after the reception. (Kudos to the gallery and the artists—they provided a plethora of things to eat and drink—best food offering of any gallery reception I’ve ever been to!)

A SHORT STROLL DOWN (BLOG) MEMORY LANE: Back in December 2007 I posted a photo I shot of Jeff in front of his winning entry at a Huntley Meadows photo contest on my “One photo every day” blog. I wrote about Regina’s garden (which is one of Jeff’s inspirations) in September 2007. I posted a sweet photo of Regina with one of their three cats, Dusty, this past May. This past June I photographed Tom’s beautiful farm and two of the creatures I came aross—a beautiful Widow Skimmer dragonfly and a hungry White Death Spider. You’ll find those three postings here. And in April 2008 I wrote about Karen’s memorial garden to honor her mother.

Remember, the show runs until February 1, so if you’re a local resident (or traveling in the area during this time), stop by Gallery West to see the exhibit. Gallery West is open from Wednesday through Sunday. From January to March, hours are 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. From April to December, hours are 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Other hours are available by appointment.

_________________________________________________________________________

Jeff and I often go on short photo field trips. One of our favorite local places is Green Spring Gardens, where Jeff photographed his gorgeous pink poppies photo! Here are some of my photos from our field trips:

Green Spring Gardens
https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/08/07/in-bloom-at-green-spring-gardens/
https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/05/18/glorious-poppies/
https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/07/31/wordless-wednesday/
https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/05/18/love-in-a-mist/
https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/05/18/a-day-of-bliss/
https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/08/31/honorine-jobert/

Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens
https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2007/07/22/kenilworth-gardens-7222007/
https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/07/20/worth-standing-in-the-july-heat-for/
http://www.cindydyer.com/KenilworthGardens/

Brookside Gardens
https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/04/23/brookside-gardens-2/
https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/09/05/wings-of-fancy/

U.S. Botanic Garden
https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/03/13/in-my-heaven/
https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/03/11/us-botanic-garden/





Birthday bouquet

20 10 2008

Today Elizabeth and Rob sent me this beautiful birthday bouquet, making me yearn for spring and summer all over again! See the photos I shot of them with their beautiful baby girl, Josie, in the links below:

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/10/19/josie-au-naturel/

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/10/17/josephine-margaret-and-family/

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/10/17/daddys-very-little-girl/


© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Last of the lilies to bloom

18 07 2008

I give you my magnificent Stargazer lily, blooming on the front porch this morning.

Until the early part of the last century, only wild lilies grew in parts of Europe, Asia, and America. They weren’t cultivated until the 1920’s when horticulturists began experimenting with the first hybrids. Oriental lilies began to appear in conservatories, and were wildly popular because they were easy to grow and offered such dramatic flowers. We have hybridizer Leslie Woodriff to thank for the stunningly beautiful Stargazer lilies. Learn more about Woodriff (with all his eccentricities) here.

The Stargazer is very fragrant, too, and does well in full sun to partial shade. Stargazers produce six to nine blooms, 6-8 inches in diameter. You can actually watch these lilies bloom in a time-lapse video here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





And the stately lilies stand…

7 07 2008
And the stately lilies stand
Fair in the silvery light,
Like saintly vestals, pale in prayer;
Their pure breath sanctifies the air,
As its fragrance fills the night

Julia C.R. Dorr, American author, 1825–1913


Photos © Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Lilymania

6 07 2008

I have no idea what kinds of lilies these are. All three just bloomed in the backyard garden. The two on the left bloom on stalks less than two feet tall. The very large one on the right blooms on stalks that are over four feet high. The blooms are huge and you can smell them from across the yard. Just heavenly! (Lily fanatics, feel free to chime in if you know the names of these three beauties).

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Backyard blooms

22 06 2008

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. www.cindydyer.com/GardenPhotos

See more of my garden blooms here, here, and here.





Told ya I was smitten with lilies…

18 06 2008

and here’s the proof….all of these were photographed in my front and back yard gardens. All but the hot pink stargazer lily (center) and the deep orange lily (next to last row, left) were shot just this afternoon.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Halleluiah light

17 06 2008

It’s official. I’m smitten with lilies. All colors, shapes, and sizes. Everywhere in our garden, both front and back yards, lilies are bursting open daily. I cannot tell you the names of any of those in bloom at the moment. All I know by name are the Stargazers and the Casablancas, both of which have not yet bloomed.

Every year I add more lily bulbs, despite the lack of real estate in the garden. They fill the empty spots in the beds and large pots. I am lured by the cheap price and abundant varieties…bags full of promise…pretty before they even show buds…heralding summer with sturdy green stems and large, showy, shouting flowers in every color imaginable…pretty and garden-filling even after the blooms are gone.

This sherbet-yellow-pink variety is outside my studio door, blooming by the Concord grape canopy, dappled in sunlight—casting and reflecting what I like to call “halleluiah!” light (cue in choir music here)…summed up in one word—yummy!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





In my heaven…

13 03 2008

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. www.cindydyer.com/GardenPhotos

More shots from this year’s Orchid show at the U.S. Botanic Garden.

secondorchids.jpg





Chanticleer Garden

5 08 2007

Michael and I took a day trip up to visit Chanticleer Garden in Pennsylvania on Friday. When we got there, we only got to see the gardens for about 1/2 hour and were halted by a severe thunderstorm. We headed back toward home, figuring the day was a goner, but then the sky cleared and the sun came out! So, we headed back to the gardens and were able to enjoy the sights for a few more hours. This place is an absolute paradise! If I won the lottery (would have to play to actually win, I suppose), this is what I would create. Exactly this garden (with my added artistic touches, of course)….it is joyfully whimsical, flows beautifully, a tapestry of colors and textures and shapes…myriad places to sit and contemplate…many side trails to explore…a beautiful estate home surrounded by tropical annuals of every kind and many different water features…majestic old trees anchoring the 35 acres…hummingbirds and butterflies at every turn…lotus blossoms, water lilies, several ponds…”ancient” ruins…waterfalls…trails leading through fern covered forests…even the restrooms (in two locations in the middle of the property) are decadent and beautiful!

While the original grounds were no doubt beautiful with rolling greens and stately trees, present-day Chanticleer is the work of 7 horticulturists (and supporting seasonal staff) with amazing imaginations and seemingly unlimited funding for their creative fantasies!

I shot as much as I could with the on-and-off again sprinkling, fogging lenses, and increasingly uncomfortable humidity level. This collage will give you an overall sense of how breathtaking this place is despite those photography obstacles. One of my favorite areas is the “ruins” of an old house (a NEW partially assembled “house” built on the foundation of an original home…it even has what I called a pool table (it was long like a real pool table but was filled with water)…a fireplace complete with a wrought iron screen and a “living” mantel built of succulents and cacti. And the best part? It had a “library,” complete with carved stone and marble “books” strewn around it. You can just imagine how this biblioholic felt about that room!

To learn more about this wonderful place, visit: http://www.chanticleergarden.org/

AND NOW FOR THE ARTISTRY IN THE GARDEN (my favorite? scroll down to the bottom of their website and look at the stone couch and chairs….I told Michael all he needed was a remote control and he’d be set…he then pointed out there already was a remote control carved out of stone with semi-precious “buttons” on the end of the couch!). Just imagine lying on that couch with a good book on a balmy spring day (and a cushion to soften things up).

http://www.chanticleergarden.org/artistry.html

chanticleer.jpg

© 2007 Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.