Here comes the bride…

6 04 2014

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Kim Solo





From the travel archive: Sunset at Solomon’s Island, MD

17 12 2011

Solomon’s Island is located at the southern tip of Calvert County, where the Patuxent River meets the Chesapeake Bay.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Same time, last year: One shot and he was off!

19 07 2011

I posted this photo last year around this time. Michael and I are headed up to McKee-Beshers in Maryland to photograph the sunflower field this morning (otherwise, this gal would not be up and typing this early! 😉 I hope to capture a slew of new photos—stay tuned for the results.

Originally posted in July 2010

Unlike the Dogbane Beetle, who let me photograph him for almost 15 minutes, I got just one shot of this Cucumber Beetle before he was off to another sunflower. I wish I could have had time to add some ring flash light to add extra sharpness to his body, but the composition draws me in, so I’m giving myself a brownie point for that!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Re-post: White Peacock Butterfly (Anartia jatrophae) on Plumbago flower

26 05 2011

Originally posted August 8, 2010. Photographed at the Wings of Fancy exhibit at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, Maryland

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Large Tiger or Tiger Mimic-Queen (Lycorea cleobaea)

8 08 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





White Peacock Butterfly (Anartia jatrophae) on Plumbago flower

8 08 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Queen (Danaus gilippus)

8 08 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Monarch butterfly

8 08 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Banded Orange (Dryadula phaetusa)

8 08 2010

Photographed at the Wings of Fancy exhibit at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, Maryland

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





A Monarch for Mary Ellen

8 08 2010

Photographed this afternoon at the Wings of Fancy exhibit at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, Maryland. More images to come!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Fields of gold

27 04 2009

There appears to be a recurring theme of gold…I can’t help myself! On my recent road trip from Virginia to Alabama, I drove past acres of these beautiful  yellow Wild Turnip flowers in the Shenandoah Valley near Natural Bridge, Virginia. I did a u-turn to fill up with gas and ask how to get to the access road so I could photograph this jaw-dropping scenery. I’d like to thank (Name to come after I clean up the car and find the map!), who was friendly, very helpful and sent me to Herring Hall Road to head toward the fields.

The title of this posting hails from the song, Fields of Gold, by Sting (listen to it here). I first heard this song sang by the late Eva Cassidy and I really love her slower version here. I discovered her music at Borders almost a decade ago, and was saddened to hear that she had passed away from melanoma in 1996 at the age of 33. She grew up in Bowie, Maryland, not far from where I live. And if you want to hear one of the most beautiful renditions ever of Somewhere Over the Rainbow, listen to her version here.

You can hear Katia Melua (another of my favorite singers) singing Somewhere Over the Rainbow as a duet with Eva onscreen in the UK production of Duet Impossible here. The video also contains a brief biography of Eva Cassidy. And speaking of Katie Melua’s work, I just love Nine Million Bicycles shown here and I Cried For You, shown here. Her videos are really clever.

After Katie released Nine Million Bicycles, she amended it when scientist Simon Singh corrected her “bad science” on exactly how old the universe is. Listen to her very funny amended version presented at a TED conference here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

wildturnip





At long last, butterflies en masse!

4 10 2008

The butterflies that we have waited for (en masse) all summer have finally begun appearing regularly, particularly Monarchs and now the American Painted Lady Butterfly (Vanessa virginiensis) I photographed late this afternoon. It is very similar to the Painted Lady Butterfly (Vanessa cardui). Those same links show you how to distinguish between the two. 

They move really quickly, so I wasn’t able to get many good shots before they moved onto other flowers in the garden. Most of the butterfly activity in our front yard garden is in the lilac-colored butterfly bush. I saw two American Painted Ladies and three Monarch butterflies just this afternoon, along with several Cabbage White butterflies and Silver-spotted Skippers—both daily visitors to the garden since early summer. This same butterfly bush is also a magnet for the Snowberry Clearwing Hummingbird Moth.

Click here to see a Cabbage White butterfly I photographed in the backyard in June. Click here to see Monarchs, Silver-spotted Skippers, Swallowtails, and other beauties I photographed at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia. Learn more about how to create a habitat for Monarch butterflies on the  Happy Tonics web site.

I found a really terrific butterfly identification site here. To identify your specimen, click the boxes that correspond with things such as the group (moth, butterfly, etc.), how the wings curve, whether they’re curvy, jagged, or wavy, then how the rear wing is shaped, whether there are broken bands or dark or light ones, main colors that appear, and your location. After you click on all the matches to your specimen, a list of possible “suspects” will show up on the left. Simply click on each one until you find one that best matches your specimen! I’ll be using this site a lot more often.

If you really love butterflies, check out the images I shot in September at the Wings of Fancy exhibit at Brookside Gardens. And while we’re on the subject of Brookside Gardens, click here to see images I shot when my friend Jeff and I took a field trip with the Mount Vernon Garden Club this past April.

WANT TO SEE SOMETHING NEAT? Click here to view two claymation movies that illustrate butterfly metamorphosis. They were created by third grade students from Kings Park Elementary School in Springfield, Virginia.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Blue Chicory

21 07 2008

Blue Chicory
It has made its way, on wind
far into the city, and it nods there,
on street corners, in what July wind
it slips garner. Since childhood
I have loved it, it is so violet-blue,
its root, its marrow, so interred,
prepared to suffer, impossible to move.
Weed, wildflower, grown waist-high
where it is no one’s responsibility
to mow, its blue-white
center frankly open
as an eye, it flaunts
its tender, living lingerie,
the purple hairs of its interior.
Women are weeds and weeds are women
I once heard a woman say.
Bloom where you are planted, said my mother.

Catherine Rankovic (reprinted with permission)

Learn more about Catherine here: http://www.catherinerankovic.com/

I photographed this tiny pastel-blue flower against a grand backdrop of sunny yellow sunflowers at McKee-Besher Wildlife Management Area in Poolesville, MD this past weekend. Here’s a map showing the location. Learn more about this wildflower’s history, growth habit and herbal use here.

Photograph © Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Brookside Gardens

23 04 2008

Jeff and I had a field trip to Brookside Gardens today. We joined Pat and Delores (coordinators) and other members from the Mount Vernon Garden Club. It was a beautiful spring day with ample photo opportunities. Thanks, Pat and Delores, for making us feel right at home with your group! Brookside Gardens is an award-winning 50-acre public display garden situated within Wheaton Regional Park in Wheaton, Maryland. Visit Brookside at http://www.mc-mncppc.org/parks/brookside/

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.