Green Frog (Rana clamitans)

6 08 2017

Green Frog (Rana clamitans), photographed at McKee-Beshers Wildlife Management Area in Poolesville, MD

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Frog at McKee 1





Sunflowers

5 08 2017

Sunflowers at McKee-Beshers Wildlife Management area, shot in macro mode with Camera+ app on iPhone 6s (diffused sunlight with a tri-grip diffuser)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Sunflower 1





Common Blue Dasher dragonfly

22 07 2016

Many of the dragonflies we saw today had ragged wings (this one had just a little bit of wear and tear). With macro shots, you have to make a decision what you want in focus most of the time, particularly with objects that aren’t relatively flat (for instance, if you shoot overhead on top of a daisy or parallel to a sunflower, you’re going to get a wide range of the image in perfect focus). In the case of this dragonfly, I focused on the body and the head. That meant the wings were going to be less in focus. Photography really is all about decisions like these and sharing your vision of the world.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Common Blue Rusty Pole





Common Blue Dasher dragonfly

22 07 2016

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

 

WEB Common Blue on Grass





Common Blue Dasher dragonflies

22 07 2016

Ready yourself for an onslaught of Common Blue Dasher dragonfly shots (last week I inundated you with Slaty Skimmer dragonfly images from Kenilworth)…quick trip to McKee-Beshers Wildlife Management Area in Poolesville, MD with my friend Michael Powell (visit his nature photography blog here). We may have avoided morning traffic by leaving later, but we sure did endure some increasingly hot weather. We started at a different parking area than normal—this area had a large pond and a gazillion (no exaggeration) Common Blue dragonflies (Pachydiplax longipennis) perched on every stick I passed by! I like this image because it shows another dragonfly way out of focus in the background in stark contrast to the sharply-focused one in the foreground.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Two Blue Dasher





And now for something completely different…

22 07 2016

And now for something completely different—a “dragonfly tree” in silhouette! Common Blue Dasher dragonflies (Pachydiplax longipennis), photographed at McKee-Beshers Wildlife Management Area in Poolesville, MD.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Dasher Tree





The studio effect

22 07 2016

With the sky full of clouds and very washed out during the heat of the day, doesn’t this look like I invited this Common Blue Dasher dragonfly (Pachydiplax longipennis) into my studio for a portrait session against a white backdrop? Pretty awesome and unexpected effect!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Studio Look Blue Dasher





Katydid

21 07 2013

My friend Michael and I think this might be a tiny Handsome Meadow Katydid nymph (Orchelimum pulchellum) because of the blue tint to the eyes. I photographed it at McKee-Beshers Wildlife Management Area this morning.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

HandsomeMeadowKatydid





(Unidentified) beetle on Chicory bloom

20 07 2013

I photographed this red headed fellow at one of the McKee-Beshers sunflower fields this morning, alongside my fellow avid photographers, Heather Callin, Michael Powell and Marisa Sarto.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

RedHeadBeetleChicory lorez





Sunflower closeup

19 07 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Here comes the sun(flower), do do do do…

19 07 2011

I shot this image at McKee-Beshers Wildlife Management Area in Montgomery County, Maryland. The sunflowers are shorter (once again) this year (some barely knee high), so it’s a challenge to get shots head on without groveling in the red dirt. The field was buzzing with honey bees, bumblebees, Cabbage White butterflies, cucumber beetles and various other flying critters. Very few of them cooperated for this photographer, though. I was bombarded several times by wayward bumblebees that tried to fly through me to get to a prized sunflower on their radar. Michael and I shared the field with only three other photographers (and a poorly constructed scarecrow that we thought was another person). I used a wide angle lens (atop a tall ladder) to get this shot.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Same time, last year: One shot and he was off!

19 07 2011

I posted this photo last year around this time. Michael and I are headed up to McKee-Beshers in Maryland to photograph the sunflower field this morning (otherwise, this gal would not be up and typing this early! 😉 I hope to capture a slew of new photos—stay tuned for the results.

Originally posted in July 2010

Unlike the Dogbane Beetle, who let me photograph him for almost 15 minutes, I got just one shot of this Cucumber Beetle before he was off to another sunflower. I wish I could have had time to add some ring flash light to add extra sharpness to his body, but the composition draws me in, so I’m giving myself a brownie point for that!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Revisited: Dogbane Leaf Beetle (Chrysochus auratus)

16 07 2011

Originally posted July 11, 2010

I stalked this beetle at the McKee-Beshers Wildlife Management Area this morning for at least 20 minutes—it wasn’t hard; he moved up and down the same sunflower leaf the entire time. I was just mesmerized by his rainbow coloring! In researching what type of beetle it was, I came across this site here, which describes this insect’s beautiful coloring:

The dogbane leaf beetle has a special type of color that shines and changes as the insect changes position or we change position looking at it. This changing color is called iridescence. The beetles’ iridescence is produced by special body structures and light. The surface of the body parts of this beetle is made up of stacks of tiny, slanting plates, under which is a pigment (substance that produces color). Some light rays reflect from the surface of the plates, and other light rays reflect from the pigment underneath. At different angles, the light reflects at different speeds, causing interference and resulting in our seeing different colors that shine.

Adult beetles feed on Dogbane (Apocynum cannabinum)—hence its name—and milkweed. I’m glad I didn’t touch the little guy—apparently they avoid some predators by giving off a foul-smelling secretion when they are touched!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Revisited: Sunflower closeup

16 07 2011

Originally posted July 11, 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Ah….nothing beats sunny yellow against cornflower blue!

13 07 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Bee on Sunflower

11 07 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Camouflage!

11 07 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






One shot and he was off!

11 07 2010

Unlike the Dogbane Beetle, who let me photograph him for almost 15 minutes, I got just one shot of this Cucumber Beetle before he was off to another sunflower. I wish I would have had time to add some ring flash light to add extra sharpness to his body, but the composition draws me in, so I’m giving myself a brownie point for that!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Dogbane Leaf Beetle (Chrysochus auratus)

11 07 2010

I stalked this beetle at the McKee-Beshers Wildlife Management Area this morning for at least 20 minutes—it wasn’t hard; he moved up and down the same sunflower leaf the entire time. I was just mesmerized by his rainbow coloring! In researching what type of beetle it was, I came across this site here, which describes this insect’s beautiful coloring:

The dogbane leaf beetle has a special type of color that shines and changes as the insect changes position or we change position looking at it. This changing color is called iridescence. The beetles’ iridescence is produced by special body structures and light. The surface of the body parts of this beetle is made up of stacks of tiny, slanting plates, under which is a pigment (substance that produces color). Some light rays reflect from the surface of the plates, and other light rays reflect from the pigment underneath. At different angles, the light reflects at different speeds, causing interference and resulting in our seeing different colors that shine.

Adult beetles feed on Dogbane (Apocynum cannabinum)—hence its name—and milkweed. I’m glad I didn’t touch the little guy—apparently they avoid some predators by giving off a foul-smelling secretion when they are touched!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Good Day Sunshine!

11 07 2010

I rolled out of bed at 6:30 a.m. this morning (the things I do for you people!) to get ready to go pick up Jeff, my friend and fellow photog, then drive up to the McKee-Beshers sunflower field on River Road in Maryland. The weather was perfect and the sky was cornflower blue—a perfect backdrop to the cheery sunflowers! We didn’t really need to bring the big ladder—this year’s crop was substantially shorter than last year, so you could see over the field pretty easy without needing more elevation. We both got overhead shots on the ladder, so I’m glad we brought it anyway. There was a throng of other photographers already there, standing on step stools and squatting in the fields. I counted at least 20 just as we entered the area.

Although I wasn’t able to capture any images of them, the fields were full of Eastern Tiger Swallowtails, Monarch butterflies and goldfinches (would love to have gotten a shot of a yellow goldfinch on a yellow sunflower against that blue, blue sky! Sigh…

Still, I was a little trigger happy—after culling out the out-of-focus and bad exposure shots, I have 265 images to peruse (and these were all shot in just about an hour)…so stay tuned for more! You can see images from my first visit to McKee-Beshers in my July 22, 2008 posting here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.