Re-post: Christmas in Montana

4 12 2013

Originally posted 12.13.2009

I took this shot in Montana on the road between Gallatin Gateway (where Michael’s Aunt Jackie lives) and the entrance to Yellowstone National Park. We were spending Christmas at Jackie’s, along with two of Michael’s sisters and their families, in 1995. This trip included my first try at snowshoes (awkward, as expected), hiking up a mountain to find a Christmas tree Jackie had picked out (ask me about that adventure sometime), the snowmobile-on-frozen-lake-ice-fishing excursion (no luck for anyone), a fun (but very bumpy) snow coach ride with everyone through Yellowstone the day after Christmas (a gift from Aunt Jackie), me suddenly sinking waist deep in snow (along with Michael’s brother-in-law, Pete) while we were trying to get that perfect landscape shot (but we saved the cameras!), a sightseeing/shopping trip to Bozeman, and more cold and snow than you could possibly imagine. I probably shot this image with my N90s. I also brought along my Fuji G617 panoramic camera—I’ll have to find those really wide transparencies and get them scanned some day.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Advertisements




From Vimeo: Human + Ice Skates = the Perfect Camera Dolly

21 01 2011

Turn up your sound and watch this video by filmmaker Kasper Bak. It has a lovely rhythm to it. After I viewed it, the following things ran through my mind (simultaneously):

1) Wow, I really, really need that Nikon D7000 right now. Great HD video capability.

2) I would need some ice skates, too.

3) Hmmmm…just remembered that I really don’t like having my feet all bundled up in socks and laced up, corset-like into skates that feel two sizes too small. I was raised in the south…you know, where bare feet originated.

4) Oooh…wait a minute. I did try ice skating in D.C. back in my late 20s and it really wasn’t pretty. Suffice it to say, I suck at ice skating.

5) And anyway, this is metropolitan D.C. We get snow one day and it melts the next (but the schools all close anyway). I’d have to go to Montana to find ice thick enough to make my movie.

6) Speaking of Montana—-back in the late 90s when we visited Michael’s Aunt Jackie near Yellowstone for Christmas, she took all of us ice fishing. We traversed the lake via snowmobile and the kids sat on 5-gallon buckets for hours (the fish were a no-show). I remember thinking, “I just won’t get off the snowmobile. You know, just in case the ice cracks.” Apparently I’m not as smart as I look after all, despite the cute glasses. I did venture onto the ice but very, very slowly (as if that would save me?). Long enough to say I did it and to make the laughing stop. Folks, I was born in Alabama and raised in south Texas. We don’t have lakes that freeze. Sure, sure, I know you’re a native…you’re probably right that the ice really is more than a foot thick on that lake. I don’t care how thick you assure me that ice is, I just don’t know if I can truly ever trust you. What if you are wrong?

7) and just by chance you are wrong, look where my Nikon D7000 (that I don’t have) and I would end up!

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/18370836″>Dutch Winter</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/user2815124″>Kasper Bak</a> on <a href=”http://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>





The Orphaned Images Project, Installation #1

4 01 2011

This posting launches a new project that I’ll call “The Orphaned Images Project.” I am always a bit saddened when I discover albums and projector carousels at thrift stores, and yard/estate sales (their loss, my gain). Who gives up photos of their families? Are all the members of that family deceased? Was there a rift? And I wonder about the photographer. Was he/she passionate about being the family recorder (as much as I am about being one)?

I have quite a collection of 35mm slides, stereoscopic slides, family albums and loose b&w photos. Some I’ve purchased, but most I have acquired through my dad, who is always on the lookout for interesting photos for me. Doris, my dad’s friend and former co-worker, gave me some very old albums many years ago that I really treasure. These contain tintypes, daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, carte de visite or CDVs (photographic calling cards), and cabinet cards dating back to the 1800s. One album even includes a post-mortem photo of a little girl, as well as beribboned locks of hair, calling cards and newspaper clippings! I also have a collection of more than 50 hand-colored lantern slides of various scenes and people from Cote d’Azur (French Riviera). I purchased those for $50 in an antique store near Skyline Drive when I moved here in 1985 from Texas. Another great find courtesy of my dad were four metal cabinets full of stereoscopic slides, all painstakingly labeled with minute details of where/when/what was photographed. The photographer was clearly a music lover (or perhaps a music teacher)—many of the travel images are of places where famous musicians were born, performed or buried. There are hundreds of images in each cabinet!

I will share many of these images from my various collections in the coming year.

For now, a few more recent 35mm transparency images (circa 1967-71):

Photo #1: Hey, could that possibly be former First Lady Lady Bird Johnson and country singer Tammy Wynette enjoying a (plastic) glass of champagne on the afternoon of July 18, 1971? (The date was scribbled on the slide mount). I love how the lady in the groovy dress blends in with the striped couch!

Please forgive me, but both of these photos are begging to be captioned—and I’m just the one to do it.

Lady Bird: “So, anyhoo, I told her that if Lyndon pulled something like that, I would not stand by my man.”

Tammy: “I am so gonna write a song about this.”

___________________________________________

Photo #2: “Glocamora Inn” and “10-2-1967” is written on the slide mount for this photo. I did a little sleuthing and learned that there is a Glocca Morra Inn in Sweet Grass, Montana.

Wilma and Joan didn’t particularly care for Lou’s awkward advances, but if they were ever going to advance past the typing pool, they would have to find a way to endure them.





Christmas in Montana

13 12 2009

I took this shot in Montana on the road between Gallatin Gateway (where Michael’s Aunt Jackie lives) and the entrance to Yellowstone National Park. We were spending Christmas at Jackie’s, along with two of Michael’s sisters and their families, in 1995. This trip included my first try at snowshoes (awkward, as expected), hiking up a mountain to find a Christmas tree Jackie had picked out (ask me about that adventure sometime), the snowmobile-on-frozen-lake-ice-fishing excursion (no luck for anyone), a fun (but very bumpy) snow coach ride with everyone through Yellowstone the day after Christmas (a gift from Aunt Jackie), me suddenly sinking waist deep in snow (along with Michael’s brother-in-law, Pete) while we were trying to get that perfect landscape shot (but we saved the cameras!), a sightseeing/shopping trip to Bozeman, and more cold and snow than you could possibly imagine. I probably shot this image with my N90s. I also brought along my Fuji G617 panoramic camera—I’ll have to find those really wide transparencies and get them scanned some day. 35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.