Oriental Poppy ‘Prince of Orange’

15 05 2011

Oriental Poppy (Papaver orientale) is a hardy perennial that grows in zones 4-9; not frost tender; herbaceous foliage; flowers late spring to early summer (some gardeners have reported reblooming in the fall); 18-24″ height with 8-10″ spread; partial shade to full sun and average to rich, well-drained soil; all parts are poisonous. The flowers are hermaphrodite (having both male and female organs) and are self-pollinated as well as pollinated by bees.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Camouflage!

11 07 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Same time, last year

30 04 2009

Everything is blooming most recklessly; if it were voices instead of colors, there would be an unbelievable shrieking into the heart of the night. —Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters of Rainer Maria Rilke

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Spring blooms

14 04 2009

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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One more Pansy

6 04 2009

On her great blog, Digging, fellow blogger/gardener Pam posted a list of things that fall in the category of NIMG (Not In My Garden). I thought it was a great post and although I’ve internalized what I won’t/don’t have in my garden, I’ve never formed it into a list like she has.

Pansies. I’ve never grown pansies before. It’s not that I don’t like them—they were certainly tickling my muse yesterday at Green Spring Gardens. I must have spent 20 minutes just photographing the array of Pansies in bloom outside the historic house at Green Springs. Perhaps it’s the word “Pansy” that’s throwing me off?

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Ooooh…purdy!

6 04 2009

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But of course…

5 04 2009

…this lovely harbinger of spring has its own fan club—the American Daffodil Society.

And speaking of clouds (I realize this photo contains no clouds, but it does have a sky—so there’s my segue into the subject of clouds), I forgot to mention in my Window in the clouds post that there is a Cloud Appreciation Society (but of course). Their current membership is comprised of 14,384 Cloudspotters. Since I’m a little obsessed with clouds, it seems the perfect club for me to join (as if I need another hobby). Their web site is quite informative—I plan to use the Cloud Photo Gallery to identify the various photos I’ve taken on the subject. And it just so happens that I purchased the Society’s first published book, The Cloudspotter’s Guide, at the Green Valley Book Fair in Harrisonburg a few weeks ago (but of course).

I leave you with The Cloud Appreciation Society’s official manifesto:

WE BELIEVE that clouds are unjustly maligned
and that life would be immeasurably poorer without them.

We think that they are Nature’s poetry,
and the most egalitarian of her displays, since
everyone can have a fantastic view of them.

We pledge to fight ‘blue-sky thinking’ wherever we find it.
Life would be dull if we had to look up at
cloudless monotony day after day.

We seek to remind people that clouds are expressions of the
atmosphere’s moods, and can be read like those of
a person’s countenance.

Clouds are so commonplace that their beauty is often overlooked.
They are for dreamers and their contemplation benefits the soul.
Indeed, all who consider the shapes they see in them will save
on psychoanalysis bills.

And so we say to all who’ll listen:
Look up, marvel at the ephemeral beauty, and live life with your head in the clouds!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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