Monarch on zinnia

1 06 2015

Just uncovered this never-before-shared gem from my archives—overlooked in the cull of hundreds of butterfly images from the Wings of Fancy exhibit at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, MD a few years ago.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

MonarchLightPinkZinnia





Prickly pear cactus bud (Opuntia)

1 05 2013

I was in San Antonio last week to photograph interior remodeling projects for a client, but got a chance on Monday to photograph wildflowers in bloom as well. My dad was an excellent day trip companion—driving me to and fro, holding my tri-grip diffuser to soften the Texas sunshine on my subjects, keeping an eye out for dangerous vermin (I learned that if you hear a rattlesnake, freeze until you can locate where the sound is coming from—do not run or jump), stopping at a yard sale (homeowner was actually named Porter Wagoner), treating me to lunch at Texas 46 Bar & Grill in the Hill Country, and crooning classic country songs from a 25 cent CD he picked up at a yard sale (Sonny James, Freddy Fender, Bobby Bare, anyone?) en route home. More to come…

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

PricklyPearBloom lorez





Blooming in my garden today: Daffodils

11 04 2013

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

PainterlyDaffodil





Blooming in my garden today: Tulip ‘Lady Jane’

11 04 2013

The ‘Lady Jane’ Tulips are in bloom in my front yard garden. This lovely blossom has a pink underside on each petal.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

LadyJaneTulip lorez

skinnytulip





Black-Eyed Susans

1 08 2010

Black-Eyed Susans (Rudbeckia hirta). I just read that these plants are biennial and only live for two years. No wonder mine didn’t come back this year!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota)

10 07 2010

Some of you may have noticed that my photographic style is very graphic and sometimes minimalist—clean lines, stark composition, judicious use of light, pops of color, selective depth of field, and employing varying degrees of bokeh. Well, capturing a “plant portrait” of Queen Anne’s Lace (which I have avoided until now, believe it or not), isn’t easy—and it’s a hard flower to fit into my more graphic style. It’s a very delicate flower with hundreds of little flowering brachts spread over a wide, curving surface—making it hard to control the depth of field across the entire flower. I hung in there yesterday and experimented with it—resulting in a shot that I rather like—and that still suits my photographic bent!

Queen Anne’s Lace is sometimes called Wild Carrot—in fact, the carrots we eat were once cultivated from this plant. Lacy, flat-topped clusters bloom from May through October. It is a biennial plant, meaning it lives for just two years. Although many people consider it an invasive weed, many insects benefit from this wildflower—caterpillars of the Eastern Black Swallowtail butterfly (at right) eat the leaves, bees and other insects are drawn to the nectar, and other insects feed on the aphids that inhabit the flowers.

Photos © Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Quick visit to the U.S. Botanic Garden

1 04 2010

Michael and I picked up his sister Kathy and her boss from D.C. (they were in town for a workshop) to do a really quick sightseeing tour and then drop them off at National Airport this afternoon. Downtown D.C. was a madhouse with all the tourists and the big Cherry Blossom Festival in full swing! We had about 25 minutes to pop into the U.S. Botanic Garden, then we dropped them off at the Natural History Museum for another 25 minutes while we drove around. I was only able to shoot a few images at the U.S. Botanic Garden—too many people and too little time. Despite that fact, I’ll take flower-shooting time anywhere and anytime I can get it—from here on out, expect lots of flower macros! Here are a few I liked…

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Post redux: Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens

8 12 2009

If you’re in the D.C./Virginia/Maryland area, be sure to visit Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, particularly in July. The main attractions are obviously the lotus blossoms, which bloom during the truly hottest time in our area (sigh), but I’m sure there are water lilies in bloom throughout the summer.

You can view my previous posts on Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens by clicking on the links below:

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2008/07/20/kenilworth-park-and-aquatic-gardens/

https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2007/07/22/kenilworth-gardens-7222007/

What a muse that place is!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

KenilworthCollage2





Blue False Indigo

17 05 2009

Although it wasn’t identified with a plant marker at Green Spring Gardens, I’m pretty sure this is a Blue False Indigo (Baptisia australis). This herbaceous perennial in the pea family grows 3-4 feet tall and features purple, lupine-like flowers blooming in spring. Its common name refers to the use of this plant by early Americans as a (lesser) substitute for true Indigo in making blue dyes.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

PurpleBlooms





Drawing a blank

7 05 2009

I should know what this flower is, but at the moment I’m drawing a blank. Any takers? (Ed Vatza?—betcha he knows!)

UPDATE: Drumroll, please….Ed is the first to weigh in on identification. And a very close second is Catharus. Thanks to you both for chiming in—I appreciate it! Here are their comments:

ED VATZA: Oh, oh! The pressure is on! Looks like they could be Wild Geraniums. They are just beginning to think about opening here in PA. They are beautiful flowers. We just added some to our backyard native plant garden. Very nice image, by the way. Great color and sharpness.

CATHARUS: Looks like wild geranium.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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