Re-post: Portrait of Nicole

2 08 2012

Originally posted 12.12.2009

One of my favorite portrait subjects—Nicole

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Outta my way!

6 01 2010

This is one of my favorite Polaroid transfers. I shot the original image (Velvia transparency) one summer at the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, MD. While the original isn’t a bad image, it has more impact as a transfer, I think. This image was one of many I posted in a collage in October 2007 on this blog. See that posting here. I’ll post some more of those images enlarged and individually in the future. I’ve also run across some additional transfers I hadn’t scanned yet, so I’ll post those when I do.

FYI: I found this link here on photographer Holly Francis Dupré’s website. She has developed a comprehensive guide to creating Polaroid transfers that is free to download.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Gentoo penguin at Port Lockroy, Antarctica

15 12 2009

Adult Gentoo penguin, photographed near the Port Lockroy Station A at Port Lockroy, a harbor on the Antarctica Peninsula of the British Antarctic Territory. Just a few years before my trip, Port Lockroy was renovated. Operated by the United Kingdom Antarctic Heritage Trust, it is now a museum and post office. Gentoo penguins were plentiful on almost every stop we made on this trip.

From Wikipedia: A major experiment on the island is to test the effect of tourism on penguins. Half the island is open to tourists, while the other half is reserved for penguins. So far, interestingly, the results show that tourism has a slight positive effect on penguins, possibly due to the presence of people being a deterrent to skuas—Antarctic birds that prey on penguin chicks and eggs.

Speaking of skuas—I did get some photos of those birds, but fervently hoped I wouldn’t witness one dragging off a lone chick. I’m happy to report no Gentoo chicks were skua-napped on my watch (not that I could have done anything about it—but still…) 35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.







Mount McKinley, Alaska

13 12 2009

I took a flightseeing tour from Talkeetna over the base camp of Mount McKinley when I was in Alaska in 2000. We flew over the longest glacier in Denali National Park—the 45-mile-long Kahiltna Glacier—and between McKinley’s two sister peaks—Mt. Hunter (14,500 ft.) and Mt. Moraker (17,400 feet). What an experience! I think this shot was made straight from the helicopter, right before we landed on a glacier. It was probably shot with my Nikon F5 and my 24mm wide angle lens. 35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All right reserved.





Big sky over Utah

13 12 2009

Photo notes: Nikon F5, Nikkor 24mm wide angle, Fuji Velvia slide film
35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






First view of Antarctica

13 12 2009

Along with the Captain and a couple of crew members, I was the only passenger on the MS Disko up just before dawn to see the ship approaching Antarctica! I was far too excited to sleep (and I’m not usually an early bird). I slept just a few hours (fully dressed) and then headed to the cabin so I could witness the first light over Antarctica. Pretty exciting and I can still remember how that felt! This is the very first shot I got. I took this trip in January/February of 1998, as I recall. I’ll have more slide scans to post from that amazing trip. 35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Sophie

12 12 2009

I photographed Sophie in 2002 for a magazine cover.

Photo notes: Nikon F5, Fuji Velvia slide film, Nikkor 105mm micro. 35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





ScanCafe delivers early!

11 12 2009

ScanCafe continues to impress me! I received an e-mail this morning at 8:21 a.m. stating that my order was ready for review. They were seven days early from their original date of December 18. They allow for up to 50% of your scans to be “deleted” and you’re not charged for those, believe it or not! I reviewed the files and decided not to delete any. I paid the remaining balance and less than 30 minutes later, I had a link to go download the .sit file with all the images. A DVD with the images will be sent with my original slides shortly. It took me a little over an hour to download a compressed file with 400 images—thank goodness for high speed Internet access.

Now begins the (most pleasant!) task of going through the images, processing in Photoshop (still have to teach myself Lightroom 2, though), and determining which ones are worthy of blog exposure. Some of these slides date back to the late 70s—obviously non-digital days—shot with various SLR film cameras ranging from my father’s Yashica (model unknown; he loaned it to me to shoot a high school football game and never got it back!), graduating to a Pentax K1000 purchased at Sears as a present from my dad, then on to my first Nikon—a Nikon N2020, then moving up to a Nikon N90s (followed by another N90s backup body), and ending with my ultimate dream camera (at the time)—a Nikon F5, which I still own.

Yes, I will still be shooting new stuff as my schedule permits and assignments arise, but I hope you’ll enjoy this nostalgic trip (with no particular chronological order) into the world of Kodachrome, Ektachrome and Fuji Velvia!

Photo note: I believe I shot this image of (Greater Flamingoes?) at the Gladys Porter Zoo in McAllen, Texas. I’ve always loved this composition, and it was one of my first images I selected to sent to ScanCafe. I did a 24×36 pastel/conté drawing of this image for my sister, Debbie, as a gift one Christmas many years ago. In fact, that drawing is still hanging in her foyer—unfortunately, it’s framed in an in-vogue-at-the-time (but certainly not now) shiny and modern metal frame—in hot pink (to match the flamingo legs, of course). Yowza! I should also mention that it is on the wall behind the front door when you enter, so it can’t easily gather a flock of admirers around it. Hey, I know it’s still there. Good on ya, Deboo.

LATE-BREAKING NEWS: In his recent comment, my father reminded me that I didn’t include one more film camera that was in my repertoire—my medium format Mamiya 645! Dad bought me this camera while I was still living in Texas, shooting portraits and weddings for extra cash. I had it for several years, then sold it when I moved to the Washington, D.C. area so I could buy my Nikon 2020 and various lenses to get back into shooting 35mm. I put an ad in the Washington Post and sold it for about $900, to the best of my recollection. Many years later, during one of my jaunts to Infinite Color (a local lab) to get slides processed, I started chatting with a photo techie guy who was manning the front counter that morning. One thing led to another and I discovered that he was the guy I had sold the camera to (about 8-9 years earlier). He was still using it at the time and loved it. He waxed rhapsodic over its virtues and I left the lab wishing I had kept the camera! I wonder if ScanCafe does medium 2-1/4 negatives and slides…hmmm…I sense a future project coming on!