Carousel horses

7 10 2012

I’m revisiting my Polaroid transfers made from some 35mm slide images I shot of the old carousel in San Antonio in Brackenridge Park. My dad told me the carousel was dismantled and sold years ago, so I went in search of information about the exact details and where it was moved. I found an article by Marian L. Martinello, a retired professor from UTSA College of Education and Human Development in San Antonio. Her article, “Inquiry as Detective Work: The Case of the Carousel,” describes this beautiful carousel in great detail and gives a bit of the background on its origin, so I thought it would be a perfect accompaniment to my Polaroid transfer photos. You can read it by clicking this link: Inquiry as Detective Work: The Case of the Carousel. I’ve contacted her to ask her if she knows what happened to the carousel and if she responds, I will share the results in a future post.

I sold enlargements of the carousel horses, along with some scenic transfer images, to Polaroid to hang in a gallery in their headquarters years ago (well before the company met its demise). I was contacted by someone involved in acquiring Polaroid-related images after he had seen my transfers on a website. My dad generously matted and framed all the pieces that were shipped to Polaroid. It wasn’t a huge windfall (I think I was paid about $700 or so for eight framed pieces, shipping included), but I was so honored to be part of the exhibit. Wonder what became of the images after the company shut down?

Want to learn more about the Polaroid transfer process? Click here to read a posting I wrote in October 2007, complete with links to various sites that offer tutorials and tips on creating transfers.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





From the Polaroid transfer archives: Lupine

22 02 2012

I photographed this beautiful Lupine bloom many years ago when I was visiting my friend John in Barrington Passage, Nova Scotia. When I hopped out of the car to photograph a field of these beauties, he laughed and said, “why on earth are you photographing weeds?” They grow so abundantly in his area that the locals consider them weeds! I took the 35mm slide and create this Polaroid transfer piece soon after. You can learn more about the Polaroid transfer process in my blog posting here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





My favorite Polaroid transfer image

28 05 2010

I launched a “win free notecards” contest (but you had to submit a story as the entrance fee) in May of last year. I got a few interested folks who said they had a story to submit, but I didn’t get any bites. Nary a one.

Do you have an idea how many of these notecards I still have in my storeroom? (I used them as a promo years ago and still use them for that purpose, as well as for gift-giving—-even used them as favors for our guests at our wedding in October!) Take pity and submit a story so I could send you some. Have a heart!

If you’re interested, click here to read the contest rules & regulations. Shucks, I’ll take a page out of the Payless Shoes book (BOGO—Buy one, get one)) and make this a WOGTWO (Write one, get two) deal and throw in an extra dozen cards for the winner. I may get loopy and choose two or three winners. You just never know. Remember, if you don’t enter, you can’t win!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Pemaquid Point Lighthouse

26 01 2010

This is a Polaroid transfer I made of an image I shot in Maine back in the 90s. The Pemaquid Point Lighthouse is located at the entrance to Muscongus Bay and Johns Bay, near the town of Bristol. Read about the history of the lighthouse here. Fun facts: Congress appropriated $4,000 for building the lighthouse in 1826. The land was purchased from its owners for just $90! It was built for just $2,800, and forty-year-old Isaac Dunham of Bath, Maine, became the first keeper at $350 per year. Check out the Pemaquid Point webcam here (it appears that today the snow has melted, but what a difference a day makes—check out the view from 1/24/2009 here).

Want to learn how to make Polaroid transfers from your slides? Check out Sarah Wichlacz’s visual tutorial here or download Holly Dupré’s free online book here.

I made all of my transfers using a Daylab Slide Printer and Polaroid 669 film. I still have a boatload of 669 film in my storeroom (stored in a cool, dry place, of course). I should get printer out and make some new images soon! Check out the collage of my favorite transfers in my posting on October 21, 2007 here.

I ran a “tell me your favorite garden story” contest with a pack of my notecards as the prize—and didn’t get even one bite. Kinda surprising you can’t give away free things these days! That posting can be found here. Anyone interested in free notecards? Tell me a story!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Outta my way!

6 01 2010

This is one of my favorite Polaroid transfers. I shot the original image (Velvia transparency) one summer at the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, MD. While the original isn’t a bad image, it has more impact as a transfer, I think. This image was one of many I posted in a collage in October 2007 on this blog. See that posting here. I’ll post some more of those images enlarged and individually in the future. I’ve also run across some additional transfers I hadn’t scanned yet, so I’ll post those when I do.

FYI: I found this link here on photographer Holly Francis Dupré’s website. She has developed a comprehensive guide to creating Polaroid transfers that is free to download.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Tell me a story, win a freebie!

22 05 2009

I would love to hear from fellow gardeners who have the same modus operandi as me I have when it comes to squeezing in just one more plant…or tell your tale about an incorrectly labeled plant, your greatest plant bargain ever, how you handled an overload of tomatoes (or squash, etc.), or when you realized you were a “gardener obsessed.” Perhaps you have had a humorous (or not so) encounter with a garden critter or a run-in with poison ivy. Tell me about your favorite garden or nature experience. Tell me what your garden means to you. Did gardening change your life, improve your health, wreck your relationship, forge a friendship, clean out your wallet or save your sanity?

Vanna, show them what they could win…
The
top five winning contributors will be published on this blog and will also receive a free package of my Polaroid transfer notecards (4-color images printed on cream speckled card stock with contrasting seafoam blue green speckled envelopes—all on recycled paper—and each card is signed). There are 12 different images (see collage below): carousel horse, Canadian maple leaf, sunrise at Cape May, Monument Valley, red rose, tulips, Cape May seagulls, Saguaro cactus, kids on the beach, cactus blooms, Camilla’s lace dress and Canyon de Chelly.

RememberStarOdds of winning are infinitely better than the lottery! You may submit up to five stories and there is no cap on the length (although any entries venturing close to War and Peace heft will be severely edited for publication). Entries will be judged by a panel of my fellow gardeners and authors (all of whom will be compensated—in the form of notecards). Entries will be judged on creativeness, resourcefulness, originality, and empathy/sympathy/laugh/tear-jerk factor. You retain all rights to the stories (and photographs, if included) you submit.

Please e-mail entries to me at dyerdesign@aol.com. Be sure to put “Notecard Contest” in your subject line and include your name and mailing address in the e-mail. Deadline: June 30, 2009

Read more about the Polaroid transfer process and my notecard venture on a previous posting here.

Cards are also available for purchase (in packages of 6, 12, or singles). Inquire within!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Polaroid Cards Collage





Digital Polaroid transfers, continued

19 01 2009

Here’s my second attempt at a Polaroid transfer created digitally. After reading Scott’s comment, I agree that the instructions to use a watercolor paper texture (from a digital photo of the paper) added a bit too much texture, so I used Photoshop to achieve a more linen-like texture. And Scott’s right about the fading, but initially I was always able to get pretty intense colors in my transfers. They do fade, so if you intend to give the images away or sell them, I advise creating high resolution scans on your flatbed scanner (at original size, RGB, 300 dpi), then printing on archival matte paper (or even watercolor-textured archival inkjet paper) to duplicate the texture of the original transfer. This will ensure that they won’t fade. I find that when the original do fade, they tend to go to a bit more blue cast. I think one of the things that is off with the transfer below is that there isn’t enough blue in the “residue” around the image. I did look at some of my originals and not all of them have that tell-tale inky blue cast in the residue, though. And the other thing missing are flawed areas (when the print doesn’t lift well in some areas, it tears away the emulsion and you’ll get “hot spots” in the print. That doesn’t always happen, but it’s pretty common. I like mine with as few hot spots as possible, hence why I went through so much Polaroid film in creating those images in the last post!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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