Fuji G617 archives: Bryce Canyon

31 12 2010

Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah, photographed in the mid 90s (not sure exactly what year) with my Fuji G617 panoramic camera and Fuji RVP transparency film. The image height to width ratio is 3:1 and only four photographs can be made per 120 roll! The transparencies are 2.25″ x 6.5 inches long (6×17 cm). The angle of view with the fixed 105mm f/8 lens is about the same as my Nikon 24mm lens.

After my first trip (with my dad) to the Southwest, I was flipping through Joseph Meehan’s Panoramic Photography book and saw an image of Monument Valley shot with this camera. I knew then and there I had to have one, but certainly couldn’t afford the over $3,000 price tag for such a specialized camera. I found a brochure for one, tacked it over my computer, and vowed to work toward the lofty goal of acquiring one. I had wished fervently that someone would sell a used one. Voila!—a few weeks later one was advertised in the Washington Post for $1,900. The seller had used it just six times, photographing Little League group shots. It was in pristine condition and I was thrilled to become its second owner (he even reduced it to $1,800 just to reward me for my enthusiasm). I just saw one on eBay for that price and B&H Photo has a used one for $2,295.00. I’m happy to learn that this camera has held its value. Years later I was fortunate to meet Joseph Meehan at a photography seminar and had him autograph my copy of his book. Seeing these old images makes me want to go buy Fuji 120/220 transparency film (hmmm…how hard is that going to be to find in this digital age?) and lug my camera out to the great beyond!

Want to learn more about this attention-getting, shark-cage-surrounded, completely manual and mechanical film camera? Check out photographer Flemming Bo Jensen’s write-up on the Fuji G617 here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





From my 35mm slide archives: Monument Valley

19 05 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Saquaro cactus

13 12 2009

This image (definitely shot with Fuji Velvia slide film) was shot in Saguaro National Park in Tucson, Arizona. 35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Canyonlands from the air

13 12 2009

I shot this image during an aerial excursion that my friend Cammie and I took over Canyonlands National Park and Monument Valley years ago. Unfortunately, the plane trip got cut a little short due to lightning storms over Monument Valley (and yes, I was shooting that when it was happening!). I was disappointed the trip was ending thirty minutes earlier (meaning less photography time), but I think Cammie thought the plane ride was plenty long!
35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Aspens in Sedona

27 02 2008

Oak Creek Canyon in Sedona, Arizona…Oct. 20, my 30th “milestone” birthday…Dad climbing an apple tree and shaking apples down for our afternoon snack…perfect fall weather, perfect fall light…fallen red leaves in the dry river bed…vibrant yellow Aspens against a clear blue sky…by far my most memorable birthday, bar none. Thanks, Dad.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Way out (south)west

25 02 2008

Here is just a small sampling of some of my southwest photos, scanned from 35mm Fuij film slides. Images cover Kodachrome Basin State Park in Cannonville, Utah (http://www.utah.com/stateparks/kodachrome.htm); Saquaro National Park in Tucson, Arizona (http://www.nps.gov/sagu/); White Sands National Monument, New Mexico (http://www.nps.gov/whsa/); Canyon de Chelly (and the White House Ruins) in Chinle, Arizona (http://www.nps.gov/cach/), and San Xavier del Bac Mission in Tucson, Arizona (http://www.sanxaviermission.org/)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Wide open spaces

24 02 2008

I’ve rediscovered my 35mm slides from my many Southwest road trips after getting the slide scanner hooked back up. Once upon a time, I shot with a Nikon N90 or my “newer” F5 and Fuji slide film exclusively (ISO 50 or 100). I remember those days… hundreds of dollars worth of film on each trip, hauling at least 20-30 rolls in a cumbersome bag, trips to and from the photo lab, film processing costs, culling at the light table (toss, keep, toss, keep, um…maybe), putting everything in PrintFile slide sheets, and filing into binders. (Lucy, you got some scanning to do!) I spend more time at the computer than in those days, but I wouldn’t trade the new technology for anything!

Here are two of my favorite sky shots. The one on the left was taken somewhere in Arizona or Utah. The other was taken at the Petrified Forest National Park (http://www.nps.gov/pefo/) in Arizona. The skies out there always mesmerize me; as a result, I have tons of shots of cloud-dominant images in my archives! Now that I’m shooting 100% digital, I need to get back out there to shoot it all again with different equipment.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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