Spring in Texas: Bluebonnets!

28 03 2011

Photographed in Austin, Texas, 3.26.2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Blushing

21 03 2011

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Check out my newly-updated Zenfolio botanical gallery here.





Grape Hyacinth

21 03 2011

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Spring glow

21 03 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Check out my newly-updated Zenfolio botanical gallery (with almost 600 photos!) here.





Triumph Tulip ‘Negrita’

21 03 2011

Can you tell how enamored I am with this beautiful flower?

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Pink sheep

21 03 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Triumph Tulip ‘Negrita’

21 03 2011

Triumph tulips result from crossings between varieties of short-stemmed Early tulips and long-stemmed Darwin tulips. They are hardy in Zones 3-8 and make excellent potted plants. They require full sun and bloom in mid-spring. I photographed this beautiful bloom against a backdrop of bright yellow daffodils.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)

21 03 2011

I think this specimen could be Muscari ‘Valerie Finnis’ or Muscari azureum. Anyone care to confirm? More little spring beauties to come…

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Yep, you guessed it. Green Spring Gardens again.

11 02 2011

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How many more days until spring?

11 02 2011

These images were all shot in one my most favorite photography spots in the world—Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia. When things are in bloom, I escape to this place as fast and as often as I can, even if it’s just for a half hour of shooting. It is my respite, my calm, my own private paradise…just me with my camera, surrounded by bountiful blooms and bustling bugs under a balmy blue sky. It is where I go to think, to dream, to regroup, to create. Spring can’t come soon enough for me!

See more images shot at Green Spring Gardens here.

© Cindy Dyer. All right reserved.






Clematis ‘Nelly Moser’

27 01 2011

As I write this, our backyard is covered in several inches of snow. It began about 3:00 p.m. this afternoon and didn’t stop until this evening. The snow fell fast and heavy and all the tree branches are outlined in white (a feast for the eyes, but not so good for the trees). Photographic opportunities abound tomorrow morning! Until then, I offer up some color from my garden last spring to contrast the white on white wonderland out there now. Could the Farmer’s Almanac really be correct? It is really only 52 days until spring?

This ‘Nelly Moser’ Clematis has been growing over our tiny backyard pond for more than nine years. In the spring of 2008 it had its most prolific blooming period ever. I wrote about it on this blog here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Agapanthus bud opening

25 06 2010

I think this is an Agapanthus africanus bud. Common names include Lily-of-the-Nile and African Lily (although it is not in the Lily family). This herbaceous perennial plant, native to South Africa, is planted in well-drained soil in the spring. It prefers full sun and blooms in the summer. The orange blobs in the background are beautiful orange daylilies!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Re-post: Siberian Iris, Green Spring Gardens

10 05 2010

Overcast (but unusually bright) skies (perfect for flower photography) + a gazillion things in bloom at Green Spring Gardens = photographer’s heaven!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

irislorez





Flowers in the mist…

22 04 2010

Green Spring Gardens, 1:24 p.m. A steady mist on a dreary day. D300 and 105mm micro in hand, Army blanket on the ground. Sharing the park with one photographer, two walkers under umbrellas, and two grazing deer coming from the woods. Blissful in spite of the weather!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Thursday blooms

1 04 2010

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Study of Summer Snowflakes

26 03 2010

I photographed Summer Snowflakes (Leucojum Aestivum) at Green Spring Gardens last year (see that posting here, along with a nifty photography tip!), and then planted a dozen bulbs in my own garden—and they’re now in bloom again here! I think they have a Calder-esque look to them, don’t you?—like little mobiles or elegant sculptures. I especially like the tension of all the converging leaf lines combined with the curving of the flowers—so graphic! Today was such a good and creative day (even after I had to put away the camera and get back to my paying design work!) Here’s wishing all my days could be like this one!

Addendum: Last year, when I was trying to identify them, I thought they were SnowDROPS. These are actually SnowFLAKES. The Snowflake is a taller flower that normally has more than one flower per stem. Snowflake petals are even and have green spots on each end. Snowdrops have helicopter-like petals and the green appears on the inner petals.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Your guess is as good as mine.

25 03 2010

No plant label on this beauty at Green Spring Gardens…so I’m stumped. Wanna hazard to guess what it is? It was in the woodland garden area and it was blooming in the shade. The blooms were small, too (maybe 1-1.5 inches), perched atop reddish-orange stems. I had to lie down on my side (in the mud, thank you very much) to photograph the downward-facing blooms. Oh, the things I do for you people!

😉

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Striped crocus

25 03 2010

Photographed at Green Spring Gardens this morning. There’s just something punchy about the combination of orange and purple, isn’t there?

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





All that’s left is a band of gold…

26 04 2009

April 18, 2009 / Highway 81 South / field of yellow flowers near the community of Natural Bridge, Virginia / Shenandoah Valley, Rockbridge County

I spoke to the proprietor of the Herring Hall B&B (in Natural Bridge) and she said the flowers, while definitely beautiful, are considered weeds and can take over a field in no time. She identified them as Wild Turnip (Brassica rapa), family Cruciferae.

The Plant For a Future database report states that the flowers are hermaphrodite (having both male and female organs) and are pollinated by bees. The plant is self-fertile and has medicinal uses.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

goldenrodfield1





Spring blooms

14 04 2009

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ginterflowers





Blooming in my garden today…

10 04 2009

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skinnytulip





Blooming in my garden today…

9 04 2009

The ‘Lady Jane’ Tulips are blooming in the garden today.  Although you can’t see it in this photo, this lovely blossom has a pink underside on each petal (see last year’s post below).

You can see more of these Tulips in a posting I did the same day (April 9) last year by clicking here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

whitelily





Virginia Bluebells

6 04 2009

Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginica) are also known as Virginia Cowslip, Lungwort Oysterleaf (which, as Dave Barry might say, would make a very good name for a rock bandladies and gentlemen, put your hands together for Lungwort Oysterleaf!), Roanoke Bells and Languid Ladies (again, a very good name for a rock band!).

Blooming in spring from March to May, these herbaceous woodland wildflowers can be found in upland forests, floodplain forests, wetlands and bluffs. They will grow in sun but prefer slight to full shade, and are ideal plants for rock gardens. Each inch-long blossom consists of five petals that form a tubular shape. The buds begin with a pinkish hue that changes to a violet blue color as they age. Although they can be pollinated by bumblebees, butterflies are the most common pollinators.

I’ve read that Bluebells bloom in profusion at Bull Run Regional Park in Manassas about this time of the year, so guess where I’m heading soon! If you’re in this area, there’s an annual Bull Run Bluebell Walk at 2:00 p.m. this Sunday, April 12. I want to avoid the crowd, so I’ll try to break away a bit from design work later this week.

Read Joel Achenbach’s recent homage to Bluebells in a Washington Post article published last month here. I especially liked: You can buy a bluebell at a garden center, but that’s like seeing a fox in the zoo. Nothing makes me weep like the sight of a wildflower in captivity.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

bluebells11





Chewk chewk chewk

6 04 2009

Melodious mockingbird at Green Spring Gardens

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mockingbird1





Snowflakes

1 04 2009

Last April I posted a photograph I shot of Snowdrops Snowflakes at Green Spring Gardens, along with some background on the plant and growing tips. See that posting here. I shot this image of a cluster of Snowdrops Snowflakes at Green Spring Gardens this afternoon. It seems they are blooming earlier this year. The pink out-of-focus areas behind the Snowdrops Snowflakes are the burgundy-colored Hellebores blooming throughout the gardens.

Thanks to Kerry for identifying them as Snowflakes and not Snowdrops!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

snowdropslorez





Lotsa Phlox

1 04 2009

Phlox paniculata — Garden Phlox — Green Spring Gardens. The sign near this plant identified it as the ‘Bright Eyes’ cultivar, but my research yielded only pink flowers with that particular identification. Any volunteers on identifying this one?

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

brighteyes





Hellebore tryst

31 03 2009

Afternoon delight at Green Spring Gardens © Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

helleboretryst





Signs of spring

8 03 2009

The snow from earlier in the week (see my Currier & Ives posting about Monday’s snowfall here) has melted, and this afternoon I discovered the harbingers of spring—Hellebores and Crocus—were blooming wildly in the front yard garden. We had just returned from the Meadowlark 2009 Photography Expo at the Meadowlark Botanical Garden in Vienna and I had my camera handy. Jeff Evans, friend and fellow photographer, joined us for this adventure. I recently blogged about Jeff’s exhibit at Gallery West in Alexandria here. Although the show ended February 1, Jeff’s work is on display there and in A Show of Hands, a Del Ray area gallery that recently relocated to 2301 Mt. Vernon Avenue in Alexandria, Virginia.

Each year I have to remind myself to look for the Hellebore blooms. These downward-facing flowers are quite shy and always hide their beauty, so when I catch a glimpse of the lime green, pink, or purple hues, I grab my camera. I posted a nice shot of one in bloom in last March here. As I plunked myself down in the middle of the bed of Pachysandra to photograph these blooms this afternoon, I was forced to assess all that needs to be done to get the garden looking good again. There’s work to be done, that’s for sure!

Speaking of the Meadowlark 2009 Photography Expo, I bought a Lensbaby Muse from Hunt’s Photo and Video‘s booth. I also discovered David Honl’s product line, HonlPhoto, at Penn Camera‘s booth. I bought the HonlPhoto Speed Strap, Gel Kit, and the 8″ Speed Snoot to use on my strobes and Nikon Speedlights. I’m always on the lookout for accessories to improve and stretch my flash capabilities. These products are reasonably priced, simply designed, and will take up very little room in my already full camera bag. Check ’em out!

I’m also debating on whether to get one of the HonlPhoto Speed Grid attachments. Read about their application on the Strobist site here. By the way, this website is an excellent resource for photographers who want to learn more about lighting!

The show continues tomorrow (Sunday) and if you’re in the area, it’s worth a visit. All of the vendors offer show prices on their products during the show. The entrance fee is $5. And don’t forget to check out the juried exhibition of photos from local camera clubs.

And after not checking the mail for two days, I discovered my Nikon Speedlight DVD, featuring photographers Joe McNally and Bob Krist, had arrived.

Photo inspiration. Photo chat. Photo gadget bargains. Beautiful weather. First blooms of spring. Neighbors out to chat. Something other than bills arrived in the mail. Today was an especially good day!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

helleboresinbloom





Yet another Bearded Iris

5 05 2008

This one was blooming in my friend Rob’s garden this weekend. In my research to identify this particular Iris (I’m still stumped!), I came across this site below. Take a look at all their gorgeous Bearded Irises!

http://www.iriscitygardens.com/bearded1.html

Their main site is: http://www.iriscitygardens.com/

Growing tips: http://www.flower-gardening-made-easy.com/bearded-iris.html

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.    www.cindydyer.com/GardenPhotos





Brookside Gardens

23 04 2008

Jeff and I had a field trip to Brookside Gardens today. We joined Pat and Delores (coordinators) and other members from the Mount Vernon Garden Club. It was a beautiful spring day with ample photo opportunities. Thanks, Pat and Delores, for making us feel right at home with your group! Brookside Gardens is an award-winning 50-acre public display garden situated within Wheaton Regional Park in Wheaton, Maryland. Visit Brookside at http://www.mc-mncppc.org/parks/brookside/

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.