Re-post: One of my favorite macro shots

10 03 2011

Originally posted 7/9/2009

The Praying Mantis by Ogden Nash

From whence arrived the praying mantis?
From outer space, or lost Atlantis?
glimpse the grin, green metal mug
at masks the pseudo-saintly bug,
Orthopterous, also carnivorous,
And faintly whisper, Lord deliver us.

Photo © Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

http://cindydyer.zenfolio.com/p270076135

MyFavoriteMacro





Harvestmen (Phalangium opilio)

31 10 2010

Harvestmen (Phalangium opilio), also known as daddy-long-legs, resemble spiders but they only two eyes and their bodies are in just one segment. They also do not spin threads or build webs and cannot produce venom. I think this particular specimen could be a “Red Harvestman,” because of its orange-reddish brown coloring and dark legs.

At Green Spring Gardens this afternoon, my eyes were first drawn to these bright purple petals against the chartreuse-colored sweet potato vine leaves in the background. After I got the tripod set up to get my first shots, I saw a stick poking out the right side of the flower. It turns out it wasn’t a stick—it was an appendage. The critter eventually made his way around the front of the flower (See there? Sometime wishing really hard does make it so!) and I pursued him like the horticultural paparazzi that I am. I’m not sure what the flower is—perhaps some kind of Aster? I’ll do some research and update this post later.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Re-post: One of my favorite macros

9 07 2009

Since I haven’t seen any praying mantis in my garden this season, I thought I’d go through my archives and look at past macros of this fascinating insect. I posted this photo much smaller in size and part of a collage in 2007 when I began this blog. To see the collage of various praying mantis in my garden, click here. This is one of my favorite shots because of the stark contrast of the bright green mantis against the purple potato vine.

I punched up the color a bit more true-to-life than the original posting, which upon revisiting I’ve noticed the color was a little flat. With improved Photoshop skills and the Pantone Color Huey calibrating my monitor, my color correction is more spot-on than. It’s a reasonably priced instrument (it’s now just $65.21—I got mine for about $80 at the time at Amazon here). I highly recommend it if you’re having problems with color from your monitor to print! My Costco prints are much closer to what I see on my monitor now. I’ve had great results with it and it’s very easy to use. It prompts you to recalibrate your monitor approximately every two weeks.

The Praying Mantis by Ogden Nash

From whence arrived the praying mantis?
From outer space, or lost Atlantis?
glimpse the grin, green metal mug
at masks the pseudo-saintly bug,
Orthopterous, also carnivorous,
And faintly whisper, Lord deliver us.

Photo © Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

http://cindydyer.zenfolio.com/p270076135

MyFavoriteMacro






Never too many flowers

30 09 2008

So much for that “give plants room to breathe” rule! They seem to be doing just fine, don’t they? This was a spectacular flower bed we saw en route from the ferry toward the Empress Hotel in Victoria, British Columbia.

The plaque reads:

The Peace Tulip Garden: A lasting commemoration in honour of the Canadian troops who liberated the Netherlands. Individually, each flower represents a memory; collectively, they represent the effort of all Canadians and the resulting friendship with the Dutch. October 14, 1995. City of Victoria, Vancouver Island

I especially liked the orange Lantana “tree” in the center. I’ve been seeing more of these available in our local garden centers (and they’re not cheap!). This border contained daisies, sweet potato vine, ageratum, salvias, dusty miller, coleus, cannas, petunias, and many other flowers.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Curb appeal

6 05 2008

Every year I plant something new in the three wrought iron baskets hanging off the front porch railing. Every other year, I plant the “this is the summer I will learn to cook, so I must have an herb garden close by” combo planters. The next year I’ll sheepishly admit that while I enjoyed the greenery, I once again did not learn to cook and so the herbs were not utilized. Last year was the futile “learn to cook” scenario; this year I’ve reverted back to stuff that’s just plain purdy to look at. My color scheme this year is bright green, red, gold, white, and purple. Very graphic, very high contrast.

After a series of “why didn’t I measure the boxes before replacing the liner” repeat trips to the nursery, I finally got the right size (note to self: pretending to plant invisible plants in an insert at the nursery is not a good way to measure how wide an insert to buy; measure first!). I then planted the baskets with marguerite daisies, marigolds, red and white verbena, purple and green sweet potato vines, and white allysum. Note the shot of the baskets with the car going by—see the passenger looking up? It’s because I was making a spectacle of myself by straddling two pots planted with stargazer lilies, feet planted on two separate walls, leaning a bit over the railing…all just to get that perfect shot. Oh, the risks I take for my viewers!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.    www.cindydyer.com/GardenPhotos