The Orphaned Images Project: Brown, North Platte, Nebr.

27 08 2015

I’m assuming this is also a Lucky Dedmore photograph. The photo was labeled “Brown, North Platte, Nebr.” Perhaps it’s the Brown family? If so, where is Mrs. Brown? There appear to be eight children—five daughters and three sons, but no one old enough to look like a mother figure. Wonder what the story is behind this portrait?

SMALL Brown North Platte HiRez





The Orphaned Images Project: Photographer Lucky Dedmore

27 08 2015

SMALL 1931 Dedmore North Platte Nebr

Several years ago, I launched a blog for what I call “The Orphaned Images Project.” I am always a bit saddened when I discover albums and projector carousels at thrift stores, and yard/estate sales (their loss, my gain). Who gives up photos of their families? Are all the members of that family deceased? Was there a rift? And I wonder about the photographer. Was he/she passionate about being the family recorder (as much as I am about being one)? If you’d like to see more “orphaned images,” visit my blog at http://www.orphanedimages.wordpress.com.

_______________________________________________________________

With just a little bit of research, I’ve discovered that Dedmore is the name of the photographer for this photograph shot in 1931. This is one of many portraits I bought in a batch from someone on eBay some time ago. This is no labeling as to who the family is, unfortunately.

Screen Shot 2015-08-27 at 5.52.08 PMClinton Orla “Lucky” Dedmore was born in Fairmont, Nebraska in 1881, where he spent most of his life. His parents were born in Iowa where they lived until their children were grown, then moved to Nebraska where they spent the remainder of their lives. The father served in the Civil War and died in North Platte at the age of 89. Clinton Dedmore opened his studio in April 1919 and remained in business until 1949. He died in 1956.

On http://www.northplattebulletin.com, I discovered an article by Kaycee Anderson about the historic Dixon Building, located at 514-518 N. Dewey in North Platte, Nebraska.

In 1934 Lucky Dedmore moved a photo studio into the second floor of the building. The owner, Harry Dixon, allowed Dedmore to put a skylight into the second floor hallway so there would be “available light” for Dedmore’s studio on the second floor, according to archived newspaper reports. The skylight that Dedmore installed is still there.

He was listed in the Who’s Who in Nebraska with this excerpt: DEDMORE, C O: Photographer; b Fairmont, Neb Nov 13, 1888; s of Elias D Dedmore-Phoebe Merrell; ed Fairmont; m Ida Hodges July 15, 1912 Joliet Ill; 1908-17 street car opr Joliet Ill; opr studio while emp by street car co; comml photog Joliet Ill, opr studio in Deming N M; 1919- owner & mgr Dedmore Studio, North Platte; mbr vol fire dept; Pioneer Ad Club, dir; MWA; Lincoln County Wildlife Club; North Platte Garden Club; Rep; hobbies, fancy woodwork, fishing, hunting; off 516 Dewey; res 221 S Oak, North Platte.

P.S. There is a remote possibility this is actually the Dedmore family and it could possibly have been set up by Dedmore. I have another photo I’m about to share that reads “Brown and North Platte, Nebr.” Wonder if that’s the Brown family?





Re-post: The (not so) Orphaned Images Project: Kindergarten graduation day

27 01 2014

From kindergarten through fourth grade I lived in San Antonio on 155 Farrell Drive in a little white ranch style house. My dad closed in our tiny carport to make a den (and did the same thing in the next house) so we would have more room. Our front porch was long and narrow, flanked by a low brick flower bed full of deep purple Wandering Jew plants.

cindykindergartenDirectly across the street lived “Aunt Opal.” I’m not sure why we called her “Aunt,” because she wasn’t a relative to any of us in the class or on Farrell Drive. She operated a kindergarten out of her home and had 11 kids enrolled when I attended. She, along with my father, were the first two people to encourage me to draw when they saw my creative potential. I remember one of my first drawing assignments was to draw a rose using colored pencils. Aunt Opal showed us how to draw the petals with a series of crescent moon shapes grouped together. I think I still have that drawing somewhere—temporarily misplaced in a safe place completely unknown to even me, of that I’m sure.

Above is my class graduation photo. I’m in the front row, second from the left, with my mouth hanging open. I certainly don’t look like the brightest of her students, but I’d truly like to believe I was. (Girls in front—as it should be!)

Aunt Opal wore June Cleaver-like, flowered dresses in polished cotton, accessorized with a single strand of pearls, big pearl button earrings, and dark cat-eye glasses. She had perfectly coiffed hair, sparkling blue eyes and looked a bit like the TV character Hazel. She always drank Tab after school was let out for the day. I know this because I shared one with her on more than one occasion while waiting for my mother to come home from work to walk me from school across the street to our house. Ah, my first diet cola—let’s blame Aunt Opal for our affinity for them now, shall we?

After driving by that house a few years ago, I blogged about 155 Farrell Drive in “Pressed between the pages of my mind,” here. You can read about how my younger sister and I staged pool parties in our back yard, sold lemonade to neighbor children and how I didn’t learn to ride a bike until I was eight years old. That same plant-filled brick flower bed was where one Valentine’s Day, my classmate Darren dropped off a box of chocolate for me, rang the doorbell, then ran away. I’ve been scaring boys away ever since!

I was taken back to that time again recently when I came across the two photos below in a dresser drawer in my parent’s guest room. Now you get to see that Aunt Opal was just as I had described her—perfect coif, polished pearls, sensible pumps and all. Below that photo, I’m on our front porch in front of the flower box, proudly holding my first diploma.

Want to learn more about The Orphaned Images Project? Learn about the origin of the project here. Visit the site at  http://orphanedimages.wordpress.com/





The Orphaned Images Project: Petticoat Junction, anyone?

12 08 2012

Scribbled in pencil on the back of this photo:

Luella Devo and me, Jesse and Adelaide Devoe on the silo

With just a few seconds of research, beginning with the fact that two of the women in this photo are likely sisters—Adelaide and Luella—I found a grave marker that indicates Adelaide Delphine DeVoe was born October 15, 1890 and died May 3, 1984. Her younger sister, Luella Adella DeVoe, was born two years later on October 24, 1892 and died April 15, 1957. They are buried in the Parfreyville Cemetery, Section 12, Dayton Township, Waupaca County, Wisconsin.

Adelaide was 93 when she passed away at Bethany Home. She lived in Waupaca for 60 years and worked for 30 years in the laundry at the Wisconsin Veteran’s Home (WVH). She had two brothers, Claude and Floyd. I can’t find any indication that she or her sister ever married or had a family.

There is very little information on the link for Luella’s gravestone. I did learn that in 1941 she was the “head laundress” of the WVH-King Laundry. Ed Fosgate was the head laundry man and there was a total of 12 employees in the Laundry. They handled 7,567 pounds per week with 3,300 of this being sheets. There were 641 members in the WVH.

I did find their father, Charles DeVoe. He was born in Rennessalier County, NY on June 26, 1855. When he was six, he moved with his parents to Fond Du Lac, WI. In 1890 he married Amanda Chapel. They had seven children (one died in infancy). They moved to Janesville and then to Oshkosh.

From the Waushara County Obituaries: Left to mourn his loss are his wife, four sons, Harley, Lloyd, Claude and Floyd, and two daughters, Adelade and Luella, all of Oshkosh, and two brothers, Henry and Willard of Etna, Washington. He died July 29, 1922, at the age of 67 years, 1 month and 3 days at the home of his niece, Mr. Ora Wing. He was sick only a few hours.

Research is fun even if these aren’t my family members! It’s like putting together the pieces of a puzzle, made easier by someone’s cursive writing on the back of an old photo.

Double-click on the photo to see more detail. Learn more about The Orphaned Images Project on my site dedicated to this project here.





The Orphaned Images Project: Class Picture Day

12 08 2012

I realize that these young students were probably told to remain motionless while their class photo was taken, but there is not one happy face in the bunch, is there? The writing at the bottom of the photo reads “Estella” (with an arrow pointing to the young girl that is seated fifth from the left), below that reads “Gobbelsville, Indiana.” The name “Berlia” is written with an arrow pointed to the child seated second from right. Berlia sounds like a girl’s name, but girls didn’t wear pants back in those days.

I did a search for “Gobbelsville” and there aren’t any results on Google. There is a town by the name of “Gobelsville,” though—an unincorporated town in Clear Creek Township, Huntington County, Indiana.

Double-click on the photo to see more detail. Learn more about The Orphaned Images Project on my site dedicated to this project here.





The (not so) Orphaned Images Project: Kindergarten graduation day

22 01 2012

From kindergarten through fourth grade I lived in San Antonio on 155 Farrell Drive in a little white ranch style house. My dad closed in our tiny carport to make a den (and did the same thing in the next house) so we would have more room. Our front porch was long and narrow, flanked by a low brick flower bed full of deep purple Wandering Jew plants.

Directly across the street lived “Aunt Opal.” I’m not sure why we called her “Aunt,” because she wasn’t a relative to any of us in the class or on Farrell Drive. She operated a kindergarten out of her home and had 11 kids enrolled when I attended. She, along with my father, were the first two people to encourage me to draw when they saw my creative potential. I remember one of my first drawing assignments was to draw a rose using colored pencils. Aunt Opal showed us how to draw the petals with a series of crescent moon shapes grouped together. I think I still have that drawing somewhere—temporarily misplaced in a safe place completely unknown to even me, of that I’m sure.

At left is my class graduation photo. I’m in the front row, second from the left, with my mouth hanging open. I certainly don’t look like the brightest of her students, but I’d truly like to believe I was. (Girls in front—as it should be!)

Aunt Opal wore June Cleaver-like, flowered dresses in polished cotton, accessorized with a single strand of pearls, big pearl button earrings, and dark cat-eye glasses. She had perfectly coiffed hair, sparkling blue eyes and looked a bit like the TV character Hazel. She always drank Tab after school was let out for the day. I know this because I shared one with her on more than one occasion while waiting for my mother to come home from work to walk me from school across the street to our house. Ah, my first diet cola—let’s blame Aunt Opal for our affinity for them now, shall we?

After driving by that house a few years ago, I blogged about 155 Farrell Drive in “Pressed between the pages of my mind,” here. You can read about how my younger sister and I staged pool parties in our back yard, sold lemonade to neighbor children and how I didn’t learn to ride a bike until I was eight years old. That same plant-filled brick flower bed was where one Valentine’s Day, my classmate, Darren, dropped off a box of chocolate for me, rang the doorbell, then ran away. I’ve been scaring boys away ever since!

I was taken back to that time again recently when I came across the two photos below in a dresser drawer in my parent’s guest room. Now you get to see that Aunt Opal was just as I had described her—perfect coif, polished pearls, sensible pumps and all. Below that photo, I’m on our front porch in front of the flower box, proudly holding my first diploma.

Want to learn more about The Orphaned Images Project? Learn about the origin of the project here. Visit the site at  http://orphanedimages.wordpress.com/





The Orphaned Images Project: Ladies who lunch

19 10 2011

Learn more about my ongoing series, The Orphaned Images Project, here and see more orphaned images here.





The Orphaned Images Project: Bathing cuties

19 10 2011

Learn more about my ongoing series, The Orphaned Images Project, here and see more orphaned images here.





The Orphaned Images Project: Gone fishin’

21 09 2011

Written around the edges of this photo:

7:30 A.M. In a few minutes he is off with a “fishing only” on a gasoline launch.

Archivist note: Hmmm….





The Orphaned Images Project: School children

21 09 2011

Written on the back of this photo (I’m assuming the names go right to left in placement in the photo):

Loretta
Beverly
Clifford
Leighton
Harold
Junior





The Orphaned Images Project: Olive and me

21 09 2011

Written on the back of this photo:

They were taken one Sunday morning & we put on something to make us look foolish. Please notice our hats. Olive and I and they do look funny, don’t they?





The Orphaned Images Project: The Altizer family

11 09 2011

The caption on the back of this photo reads, “The Altizer family, including Shep.” I can assume this branch of the Altizer family was from Virginia (since the photos were sold by a seller in Virginia). I did a quick search in Google for the family name and came up with lots of information, including a comprehensive genealogy website prepared by Jay Altizer. Perhaps Jay might know what generation of Altizers this family is! Click here to learn more about the Altizer family.





The Orphaned Images Project: Home

11 09 2011

The caption on the back reads, “Mar. 20, 1938 Home (at their home)

The guy second from left looks a little scary, doesn’t he?





The Orphaned Images Project: Giant teacher, little desk

11 09 2011

This photo was one of more than 600 b&w prints I purchased on eBay from a seller in Virginia. Many of the photos from this collection have captions (thought this one does not) and most are dated from the 30s to the 40s. To learn more about The Orphaned Images Project, click here and to see more orphaned images, click here.





The Orphaned Images Project: Gertrude Kitchens and Olive May

17 07 2011

From the writing on the back of the top postcard, I’m surmising the lovely young woman is Gertrude Kitchen (or Kitchens). It is addressed to Miss Ethel Noland, a woman I wrote about in a previous posting on this blog. There was no address or cancelled stamp, so the postcard was never sent.

The second postcard is addressed to Mrs. Frank Wilson, Idaville, Ind., RR No. 19. It was sent June 27, 1913 at 8:00 a.m. from Lima, Ohio. (Postage was just a penny!) The card reads as follows:

Dear ??? and all: How is this for outdoors picture. Why don’t you write. How are you and (Maud?) and Leonard? — Gertrude

The baby is identified as Olive May, 14 mo. old.





The Orphaned Images Project: Ethel’s postcard home

9 03 2011

This postcard was sent to Mrs. J.W. Noland in Laketon, Indiana on March 2, 1911 from their daughter Ethel in Wabash, Indiana. The postcard reads:

Dear Papa & Mother,
Received Saturday’s check—many thanks. Expect I will be home Saturday.
With love, Ethel

I’m not sure which woman on the front of the postcard is Ethel. I have several other photos from the same source with the family name “Noland” written on the back of each. Alonzo Noland, John Noland and George Noland are three of the names mentioned in several photos. I’m assuming they are brothers, based on photos.

During a cursory web search, I discovered a Mary Ethel Noland in Missouri (known to her friends as Ethel), who was President Truman’s first cousin, a fervent genealogist and keeper of all things related to her cousin’s presidency. The Mary Ethel Noland Papers (4,800 pages!) date from 1672-1971 with the bulk of material spanning 1893-1971. The collection includes postcards, printed materials, correspondence, charts, photographs and newspaper clippings relating to her genealogy of Harry S. Truman. She donated the collection to the U.S. government.

I got a tad excited about my Ethel (remotely) being that Ethel, but I really can’t connect them because Truman’s Ethel was in Missouri for most of her life; my Ethel appears to remain in Indiana throughout the series of postcards. That Ethel did have a sister (Nellie) and this postcard shows that my Ethel possibly had a sister, too. I’ve seen a few photos of Truman’s Ethel and none look quite like either of the young women in the postcard below.

It’s rather fun to research (if even just for five minutes) some background information for these orphaned photos—and they’re not even my relatives! I am consistently amazed at how much information can be found if you have a name, city, state or even a studio name written on a photo—even one dating back to the late 1800s. I know I owe most of this gratitude to the multitude of fervent genealogists out there!

A little behind-the-scenes research: My friend Barbara, a self-admitted fan of The Orphaned Images Project, just made a comment on this post and asked about the photograph—suggesting maybe it was bought at a store and quite possibly isn’t Ethel or her sister. I did a little thinking on the subject, then a little research. Here is the thread below:

BARBARA: Now I am confused…would the photo on the front of the postcard necessarily be the writer of the card? (Ethel) Back in those days how easy was it to get your photo taken and have post cards printed? (And we didn’t have Cindy Dyer around to make such cards!) So, I say neither woman is Ethel, they are just two sassy gals on a post card purchased at the local drug store or post office on which to write correspondence.
Am I missing something? I am a fan of the Orphaned Images Project. :)

ME: Barbara, that thought had occurred to me too, but I have lots of postcards that have photos of people and they’re signed on the back. One postcard has two young men on the front and it is signed like it’s from two young men on the back. It would have been easy to make a print that had postcard info printed on the back and an area to write. The subject would have a portrait taken and just request that the back of the image be postcard-ready. Sort of a pre-cursor to Costco’s Christmas card print. I’m glad you’re a fan of The Orphaned Images Project!

Oh, and one more thing….the back of a print made then was always matte finish (at least in all of those photos I have). It would be incredibly simple to simply STAMP the postcard art/type on the back and voila! You have a print that is postcard-ready!

So, as I always do, I typed in http://www.google.com and did a search for “postcards with photographs from the 1900s.” I found this article by author Mike Yoder:

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2010/nov/21/behind-lens-photo-postcards-early-1900s/

Here is an excerpt from that article that confirms my thought on the process:

For the price of a 1-cent stamp and a special postcard, Mary had printed her son’s photo on one side, added a note on the other and put it in the post. It was a turn-of-the-century social media exchange with user-generated content. In 1898 the postal service established a reduced postage rate for privately printed postcards. In 1902, the Eastman Kodak Co. produced a postcard-sized photographic paper on which images could be printed. These two events began a photograph postcard boom.






The Orphaned Images Project: Ladies in hats

8 03 2011





The Orphaned Images Project: A gathering

6 03 2011

Is he asking her to dance with him? To marry him? She seems hesitant. Suspender man seems to be admiring her assets. Several of her friends are smiling and laughing in the background. Do they know something she doesn’t know? Will she say yes?





The Orphaned Images Project: Young woman with fan

18 02 2011





The Orphaned Images Project: Couples

2 02 2011

In the early days of photography, very long exposures were required. I’ve read different reasons for the poker face on most of the subjects—everything ranging from wanting to appear upper class to the standard practice of wearing an uncomfortable brace to hold heads steady during long exposures to bad teeth to the Great Depression and wars—all giving the subjects nothing to smile about in the first place! And at that time photographs were only done by professionals. It wasn’t until cameras became available to hobbyists that photographs became more casual, more candid, and far less composed. All of the couples below exhibit that same solemn look, save for the happy hugging couple by the sea in the top left photo.

Something interesting I noticed, and I don’t know if this was common back in those days or something just this particular photographer did—several of the couples and single portraits I have in my collection show the subject(s) wearing an entire rose—stem, thorns, leaves and all—dangling at an angle with the wilted bloom facing downward. No neatly trimmed boutonnieres for this photographer!





The Orphaned Images Project: Family portrait

31 01 2011

Several observations came to my mind when I saw this photo:

1) My first thought was of one of the Damien: Omen movies. Remember when Jennings, the photographer, begins noticing that in his photographs there are things that foretell the deaths of the nanny and the priest (such as a line crossing through their back or head)? The photographer’s death is also foretold in his photograph. The first thing I noticed in this photo was the “dagger” headed toward the head of the woman second from left. Ominous!

2) The woman in the center—talk about a wasp waist! And her head appears to be a apparition—not quite all there because of the film’s exposure.

3) Someone has sketched in an outline of the man’s sleeve with pencil. Now there’s retouching in its most primitive form. Hey, we photographers try to work with what we’ve got!





The Orphaned Images Project: Picnics

31 01 2011





The Orphaned Images Project: Party of six

29 01 2011

The card this photo is mounted on reads “Hegemann, San Antonio, Tex.” With a little bit of research, I discovered there was a photographer named Otto Hegemann located on 104 1-2 E. Houston Street around 1914. Further research reveals an Otto H. Hegemann was born March 12, 1904 and passed away September 2, 1993 at the age of 89 in San Antonio. I found an Otto Hegemann, photographer, listed as a member of the Scientific Society of San Antonio. This photo is very likely to be his handiwork, although if Otto donated photography services to the Society in 1914, and he was born in 1904, he would have only been 10 at the time! It’s possible there’s an Otto Sr. and an Otto Jr.

Take a close look at the little girl on the left, sitting in her father’s lap. She has been photographed separately and (crudely) inserted into the photo, with a little bit of painting work done to blend her in. Can you imagine what Otto would say if he saw this done in Photoshop today?!





The Orphaned Images Project: Texas bride

29 01 2011





The Orphaned Images Project: Nellie’s bible & family photos

22 01 2011

In the box our family friend Doris gave me many years ago, there are two photo albums that are chock full of cabinet cards, tintypes and even a post-mortem photo of a little girl (both albums belong to a young woman from Missouri named Tippie Botts). There are also three Daguerreotypes (or Ambrotypes), three autograph books (one belongs to Tippie and the other two belong to Helen Shepherd), and a tiny bible given to Nellie by her mother in 1877.

The main title page reads: The Holy Bible containing the Old and New Testaments, translated out of the original tongues; and with the former translations diligently compared and revised, by His Majesty’s Special Command. Appointed to be read in churches. London, printed by George E. Eyre and William Spottiswoode, printers to the Queen’s Most Excellent Majesty.

The two photos below are the remaining Daguerreotypes Ambrotypes that were not inside the photo albums. I assume the trio in the photo below are siblings. In the photo of the older gent, the photographer appears to have painted something white in his hand—I can see texture on top of the image.

Late-Breaking Research!
On one ancestry website I discovered this information: Nellie’s birthname was Nellie Celeste and she was born 12.21.1871. When you look at the year Burdette Barr married Eva Trimble, you’ll note that she couldn’t have been Nellie’s mother. Further research reveals he was previously married to Hattie Grey on 9.15.1869 in Linn County, Missouri. Hattie most likely was Nellie’s mother.

Nellie married William Sterling Botts on 12.24.1891 when she was 20 years old. Her sister Carrie married Nat Hopson and another sister, Ida Belle (born 10.19.1873) married a man with the last name Littrell and then married a second time to Virgil Botts.

The smaller photo album belongs to Tippie Botts and in the front of the album I found a newspaper clipping that reads:

Death of B.G. Barr

Burdette G. Barr a former citizen of Meadville died in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, July 10. Mr. Barr had been sick about ten days with the pleurisy, and the news of his death came as a shock to his relatives and friends here. The remains were brought here for interment. The funeral was held at the Baptist church Sunday morning under the direction of the M.W.A. of which Mr. Barr was an honored member. The funeral was preached by Eld Smith of Wheeling. The immense congregation which packed the church gave evidence of the great esteem in which the deceased was help by the people of his community. With impressive ceremony the body was laid to rest in the Meadville cemetery by the Woodman. Mr. Barr was born near Beloit Wisconsin, July 18, 1849, moved to Mo. in 1869, lives on a farm near Meadville until fall of ’98. Moved to South Dakota in 1900. Had three children all of whom live in Meadville, Mesdames Nellie Botts, Carrie Hopson, and Belle Botts. He was married Dec. 1899 to Mrs. Eva Trimble who survives him. The relatives have the…(clipping torn at this point)

I’m surmising that Tippie is related to Nellie since she kept the newspaper clipping in her photo album.

Special thanks to Alan for clarifying that these are Ambrotypes and not Daguerreotypes!






The Orphaned Images Project: Tippie Botts’ album (tintypes)

22 01 2011

Tintypes are also known as ferrotypes and melainotypes. They are actually produced on a metallic sheet (not actually tin) instead of traditional glass. The plate was coated with collodion photographic emulsion and sensitized just before it was exposed. Introduced by Adolphe Alexandre Martin in 1853, it became instantly popular, especially in the U.S.

Tintypes were popular with street photographers and photographers working outside fairs and carnivals because the process didn’t require much capital to get set up in business. It was also faster to create: no negative needed and no drying time—making it a one step process. Tintypes also didn’t require mounting in a case and were not as fragile as glass-based images. They were easy to cut and fit into pocket watches or charms. It was the most common photographic process until gelatin-based processes were introduced. 

In some of the images below, the photographer hand tinted the cheeks of his subjects.

Late-Breaking Research! I just figured out that Sarah (Sallie) Buchanan Gordon (the young girl whose autograph book I previously posted, along with a lock of her hair) would later marry William Marion Botts, a farmer. They had four children: Parrilee, William Jr., Lorraine and Tippie. So it appears the contents of this box might have originated with one family after all. I’m not sure what Nellie’s connection to the family is, though—perhaps they are cousins.

(It just dawned on me that my enthusiasm for this particular project is verging on obsessive…perhaps I should be researching my own family instead? Then again, I’ve never seen photos this old from either side of my family!)

 





The Orphaned Images Project: Leisure Suit Larry and the Priest

10 01 2011

More treasures to share from my newest venture, The Orphaned Images Project. A few of my regular readers have asked if they can have a shot at captioning some photos. By all means, please feel free to do so. I will give you a little background to get you started. I promise to re-publish the photos with all of your accompanying captions.

Photo #1: Larry’s mind-tripping moire patterned suit and pre-Harry-Potterish glasses were no match for Carol’s psychedelic pop-art floral skirt. (7.30.1971)

Photo #2: I’m assuming this is in a church (there’s a priest). Apparently the church had fallen on hard times—take a look at the paper wall decor above grandma’s head! What do you read into the sheepish (baby daddy?) look of the guy on the left and the resigned look on Father Murphy’s face? (8.01.1971)

Please feel free to submit your own captions for these two photos (nudge, nudge, Jefferson, Babs and The King of Texas)

UPDATE: Captions and comments

From Jeff:

Picture One — I’m pretty sure the fellow in the top picture is the father of the guy who plays “PC” in those Apple ads. And I love how high the gal’s skirt goes. Yes, I remember the days when wearing your skirts like some old guy in Florida would was considered sexy, damn sexy.

Picture Two — “Behold the red-haired devil child! Hail Satan! Now, Father, go get me another wine spritzer and let’s get this end of days thing rolling!”

From the King of Texas:

What does that guy Jeff mean, talking about how high my skirt goes? It’s just a couple of inches above my ankles, and it will never go any higher, at least not while I’m wearing it, not even for Larry unless he moves that ring from his right hand to his left! I admit that the skirt is a bit higher waisted than I like, but it complements Larry’s tie so nicely. I found it at the Goodwill Thrift store—that’s where Larry and I shop for clothing—they have really great prices!

Second photo:
No, no, NO! My husband is the guy on my left wearing the collar, and the young boy on my right is my lover and the father of my child—got it?

From RedHeadedWoman (a.k.a. Karen):

So that’s where my favorite skirt from 1969 ended up!

From Pepe Le Peu (a.k.a. Rob):

Photo 1— William H. Masters and Virginia E. Johnson

Photo 2 — “Please hurry, I have a “Where’s the Beef” commercial to film.”