Butterfly ginger

12 07 2017

Butterfly ginger (Hedychium coronarium)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB White Flowering Ginger





White Bat Flower

25 10 2011

I photographed this exotic White Bat Flower (Tacca integrifolia), originating from Southeast Asia, in the conservatory at the U.S. Botanic Garden. This is undoubtedly the oddest-looking flower I’ve ever photographed! A tender tropical perennial, it is actually part of the yam family (Dioscoreaceae). Learn more about this unusual plant here.

From what I’ve read, they’re a bit challenging to grow. Learn more details here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Canna blooms

23 10 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





The aptly named Bat Face Cuphea

23 10 2011

Bat Face Cuphea (Cuphea llavea), also known as St. Peter’s plant, Tiny Mice and Bunny Ears, is a tender tropical evergreen perennial that prefers partial to full sun and blooms from spring through fall. Bat Face Cuphea attracts hummingbirds and bees and is drought resistant and heat-tolerant. Photographed at Green Spring Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fuji G617 archives: Somewhere Caribbean-ish

31 12 2010

Sometime in the 90s…a relaxing cruise with my friend Norma…me lugging around this huge panoramic camera (in addition to all the Nikon 35mm equipment I never leave home without)…I really have no idea which island this was (they all blurred together on this trip—and no, I don’t drink at all (never have)—it was those tropical breezes that did me in)…it could be St. Lucia / St. Thomas / St. John / Virgin Gorda / St. Barts…just pick one!…Is this not the most beautiful palette of blues ever?

Be sure to click on the photo to enlarge it in a new window.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Cat’s Whiskers (Orthosiphon stamineus)

15 09 2010

Part of the mint family, Cat’s Whiskers are herbaceous perennial flowering plants originating in tropical East Asia. They grow up to two feel tall and three to four feet wide. The flowers have an orchid-like appearance and are white or lavender, sprouting long stamens that resemble cat’s whiskers. They attract butterflies and hummingbirds and can be harvested to use in herbal teas. I photographed this plant at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Koi pond at Marie Selby Botanical Gardens

9 02 2010

On Thursday morning Michael’s father took us to the Marie Selby Botanical Gardens in Sarasota. The 9.5-acre bayfront property is best known for its living collection of more than 6,000 orchids as well as its large representation of warm tropical epiphytes. Epiphytes are plants that grow upon another plant (such as a tree) non-parasitically or on objects such as buildings or wires. They derive moisture and nutrients from the air and rain and are found in temperate zones. Epiphytes include some ferns, cacti, orchids, bromeliads, mosses, liverwort, Spanish moss, lichens and algae.

I shot the image below at the Koi Pond at Selby Gardens. I saw this statue and visualized the koi swirling around it, but the fish were right up against the edge of the pond, begging for handouts. So Michael ran off to buy fish food to help make my image happen (isn’t he the best?). He came back empty-handed since they ration out only a day’s worth of fish food for visitors to purchase. Not about to give up on my vision, I asked him to just splash water toward the statue. Bingo—the entire mass of fish started swimming in that direction. Psych! Click! (click, click, click…9 shots later…)

Wikipedia: Koi were developed from common carp in Japan in the 1820s and are a symbol of love and friendship. The carp is a large group of fish originally found in Central Europe and Asia….The ability of carp to survive and adapt to many climates and water conditions allowed the domesticated species to be propagated to many new locations including Japan. Carp as known as koi in Japan.

I especially enjoyed the art exhibit, Batiks Botanicos—Gardens, Plants and Flowers for the Soul, on display until February 23 at the Museum of Botany and the Arts in the Mansion at Selby Gardens. A native of Colombia, artist Angela Maria Isaza captures tropical and exotic plants using the batik process. Originating in the East, batik is a wax-resist dyeing technique. Isaza applies hot wax and various dyes to natural fiber cloth to create her beautiful paintings. This step-by-step process is based on the principle that wax resists the water-based dyes. After wax is applied to certain areas, the fabric is dyed in one color. The dye penetrates the unwaxed areas. This process is repeated several times. The wax is removed by ironing the cloth between newspaper pages.

Many of the paintings that are on display can be seen on her website here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.