Passionflower tendril

27 03 2015

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Cymbidium Happy Days ‘Green Dragon’ orchid

21 02 2013

How pretty is this green orchid?

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Anemone in the National Garden

30 03 2012

I photographed this Anemone bloom in the National Garden at the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington, D.C. Check out the virtual tour of the U.S. Botanic Garden here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Vertical beauties

2 11 2011

When my friend Senthil was visiting in September (to be photographed for the cover of the upcoming November/December 2011 Hearing Loss Magazine), Michael and I dropped him off at the U.S. Capitol building so he could get some photographs. I went over to check out the sprawling vertical garden display outside the U.S. Botanic Garden, which is in view of the Capitol.

Apparently the exhibit has been in place for a couple of years and I just got to see the very end of the exhibit. I can’t find anything on the web regarding who designed it or any details on the types of plants, how-to’s, etc., but I do have some photographs to share. It was really a sight to see—and had I the room to build something like this in my own backyard garden, it would happen in a nanosecond. I shot some closeups so you can see the details. The wood frames have coco fiber “shelf baskets” held into place with wire screen. The plants are tucked either directly into the liner baskets or through holes made in the side of the baskets.

There were a lot of plants that I recognized immediately, including vegetables and ornamental plants, plus herbs such as oregano, sage and basil; various coleus plants, licorice plants, flowering annuals, sweet potato vine, ferns, ivies, catmint and catnip, just to name a few. Read more about vertical gardening here.

Michael and I saw these Woolly Pocket living planters in the gift shop at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden last week. They’re made from recycled plastic bottles and come in unlined (for outdoor use) and lined (for indoor use) versions, along with wall anchors. You can line an entire wall with these pockets (which come in a multitude of sizes and colors), fill them with a variety of plants, and achieve impressive results!

But the type of vertical gardening that makes me swoon are the “succulent gardens” shown on Flora Grubb Garden’s blog here and their main website here. Jaw-dropping beautiful pieces of living art—they remind me of landscapes as seen from the air. Flora Grubb sells the tray components to achieve these looks in your own home or on a garden wall.

Authors and gardeners Susan Morrison and Rebecca Sweet recently published Garden Up! Smart Vertical Gardening for Small and Large Spaces, available here. Author and garden photographer Derek Fell has written Vertical Gardening: Grow Up, Not Out, for More Vegetables and Flowers in Much Less Space, available here. And on my list of books to add to my gardening library is green thumb artist and French botanist Patrick Blanc’s tome The Vertical Garden: From Nature to the City, available here. Want to see some spectacular living walls? Visit Blanc’s website here.





Orchid

1 11 2011

Unidentified Orchid photographed in the Conservatory at the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington, D.C.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Blue Ginger

26 10 2011

Blue Ginger (Dichorisandra thyrsiflora), photographed in the conservatory at the U.S. Botanic Garden

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





White Bat Flower

25 10 2011

I photographed this exotic White Bat Flower (Tacca integrifolia), originating from Southeast Asia, in the conservatory at the U.S. Botanic Garden. This is undoubtedly the oddest-looking flower I’ve ever photographed! A tender tropical perennial, it is actually part of the yam family (Dioscoreaceae). Learn more about this unusual plant here.

From what I’ve read, they’re a bit challenging to grow. Learn more details here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Thread-leaf Agave

25 10 2011

Originally from Mexico, Thread-leaf Agave (Agave filifera) is an evergreen perennial succulent. The name “filifera” means “carrying threads.” It thrives in dry and hot climates and is drought-tolerant and low maintenance. It prefers full sun to light shade and needs regular watering in summer, but must be kept dry in winter.

Tequila is made from the leaves and rope, food, soap and other products are made from the fibers and pulp (pretty industrious plant, I’d say!). Agave filifera rarely flowers, but when it does, greenish flowers bloom on a 6-foot tall spike. Some can bloom annually, while others only bloom every 30-40 years (As a gardener obsessed, I’ve developed a store of patience—contrary to what my family and friends might say!—but I doubt I’d have the patience to wait for that show!) The flowers turn maroon as they age.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Honeybee on Chrysanthemum

25 10 2011

Photographed in the National Garden outside the U.S. Botanic Garden

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Geranium Pelargonium x hortorum

25 10 2011

I think this might be the specialty ‘Crystal Palace Gem’ Pelargonium, although it wasn’t identified at the National Garden. I was drawn to the intense orange-red flowers against yellow-chartreuse leaves.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Echeveria setosa

25 10 2011

Echeveria setosa, a member of the Stonecrop family (Crassulaceae), is native to Mexico and is commonly known as the Mexican fire cracker or firecracker plant. It blooms from early to late April with bright red and yellow flowers. Echeverias are my favorite type of succulent and these on display in large glazed pots at the U.S. Botanic Garden are stunning! Photographed in the First Ladies’ Water Garden, part of the National Garden at the U.S. Botanic Garden

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Spathoglottis ‘Golden Passion’

24 10 2011

Spathoglottis ‘Golden Passion’, from the Orchid family, photographed in the conservatory at the U.S. Botanic Garden

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Chirita ‘Walkerae’ bloom

24 10 2011

Chirita ‘Walkerae’ bloom, photographed in the conservatory at the U.S. Botanic Garden this afternoon. Doesn’t the tubular part of the flower look like the torso and leg of a green lizard?!

Learn more about the genus Chirita from the site below by John Boggan from the Smithsonian Institute.

http://www.gesneriads.ca/genchiri.htm

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Re-post: A riot of color

13 03 2011

Originally posted 3.11.2008. Photographs taken at the U.S. Botanic Garden during their annual Orchid exhibit

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Quick visit to the U.S. Botanic Garden

1 04 2010

Michael and I picked up his sister Kathy and her boss from D.C. (they were in town for a workshop) to do a really quick sightseeing tour and then drop them off at National Airport this afternoon. Downtown D.C. was a madhouse with all the tourists and the big Cherry Blossom Festival in full swing! We had about 25 minutes to pop into the U.S. Botanic Garden, then we dropped them off at the Natural History Museum for another 25 minutes while we drove around. I was only able to shoot a few images at the U.S. Botanic Garden—too many people and too little time. Despite that fact, I’ll take flower-shooting time anywhere and anytime I can get it—from here on out, expect lots of flower macros! Here are a few I liked…

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Check out my zenfolio.com gallery!

1 05 2009

I’ve been working on putting the “cream of the crop” of my garden and landscape photos into one easy-to-navigate gallery. Eventually I’ll have the gallery set up to sell prints as well as stock photos, but in the interim, this is just a way to wrangle all of my web-viewing-only images into one gallery. I’ll be adding more images in the future. Currently there are 380 images in the Botanical Gallery. That should keep you plenty busy! If you’re a regular visitor to my blog, you’ll recognize many of the photos.

Once you click on the first link below, you can click “view all” at the bottom and see everything on one page, scrolling down as you go. If you click on an individual photo, it will enlarge and thumbnails for other images will show up on the side (as shown in the collage below). You can click on any of those to enlarge, or you can just launch the slide show in the second link below. I hope you enjoy the show!

Gallery:  http://cindydyer.zenfolio.com/p270076135

Slideshow: http://cindydyer.zenfolio.com/p270076135/slideshow

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Open a Zenfolio account with my referral code 8B9-BTJ-6G3 and save $5.00

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Fascinating Orchids

23 02 2008

I photographed these orchids last year at the annual orchid show as the U.S. Botanic Garden (http://www.usbg.gov/) in Washington, D.C. The show this year runs from Feb. 2 through April 13, and I plan on getting over there one sunny day to add to my archives!

Information on growing orchids:

http://www.argusorchids.net/

http://www.orchids.org/culture/culture.html

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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