Re-post: Fuji G617 archives: Bryce Canyon

9 12 2013

Originally posted 12.31.2010

Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah, photographed in the mid 90s (not sure exactly what year) with my Fuji G617 panoramic camera and Fuji RVP transparency film. The image height to width ratio is 3:1 and only four photographs can be made per 120 roll! The transparencies are 2.25″ x 6.5 inches long (6×17 cm). The angle of view with the fixed 105mm f/8 lens is about the same as my Nikon 24mm lens.

After my first trip (with my dad) to the Southwest, I was flipping through Joseph Meehan’s Panoramic Photography book and saw an image of Monument Valley shot with this camera. I knew then and there I had to have one, but certainly couldn’t afford the over $3,000 price tag for such a specialized camera. I found a brochure for one, tacked it over my computer, and vowed to work toward the lofty goal of acquiring one. I had wished fervently that someone would sell a used one. Voila!—a few weeks later one was advertised in the Washington Post for $1,900. The seller had used it just six times, photographing Little League group shots. It was in pristine condition and I was thrilled to become its second owner (he even reduced it to $1,800 just to reward me for my enthusiasm). I just saw one on eBay for that price and B&H Photo has a used one for $2,295.00. I’m happy to learn that this camera has held its value. Years later I was fortunate to meet Joseph Meehan at a photography seminar and had him autograph my copy of his book. Seeing these old images makes me want to go buy Fuji 120/220 transparency film (hmmm…how hard is that going to be to find in this digital age?) and lug my camera out to the great beyond!

Want to learn more about this attention-getting, shark-cage-surrounded, completely manual and mechanical film camera? Check out photographer Flemming Bo Jensen’s write-up on the Fuji G617 here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fuji G617 archives: Bryce Canyon formations

4 01 2011

Be sure to double click on the photo to enlarge for full panoramic effect!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fuji G617 archives: Dead Horse Point State Park, Utah

2 01 2011

This photo illustrates why this place is at the top of my “favorite places in the world” list. I’m hankering for a southwest road trip; whatdaya say, Dad?

Be sure to double click on the photo to enlarge for full effect!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fuji G617 archives: Park Avenue in Arches National Park

1 01 2011

One of my father’s favorite spots—Park Avenue in Arches National Park, Utah. Visit his blog, The King of Texas, here.

Be sure to double click on the image to enlarge to get the full effect!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fuji G617 archives: Newspaper Rock National Historical Monument

1 01 2011

Petroglyphs, Newspaper Rock National Historical Monument, Canyonlands National Park, southeastern Utah

The word ‘petroglyph’ comes from the Greek words ‘petros’ (stone) and ‘glyphein’ (to carve). The word was originally coined in French as pétroglyphe. Newspaper Rock features a 200 square foot area of ancient writings and symbols by four different Native American cultures on a cliff wall. The rock is part of the Wingate sandstone cliffs that form the upper end of Indian Creek Canyon. It is one of the largest and best known collection of petroglyphs. Dating back as far as 2,000 years, more than 650 images were etched into “desert varnish,” a dark manganese-iron deposit caused by rainfall and bacteria that forms on exposed sandstone cliff faces. Figures have been assigned to the Anasazi, Fremont, Anglo-Indian and Navajo. Some drawings are as recent as the 20th century, left by the first modern day explorers of the region.

Newspaper Rock is located on Hwy 211, 25 miles before the entrance to the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. It is 28 miles northwest of Monticello and 53 miles south of Moab.

Beauty is in the details, so be sure to double click on the image to enlarge it!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fuji G617 archives: Bryce Canyon National Park

31 12 2010

On this trip, my cousin Bill and I hiked down into the canyon. Suffice it to say that it is so much easier to hike down into it than it is to hike back out of it. We saw people 20-30 years older than us passing (pathetic) us on the way back up to the rim. (Yeah, sure, just sprint on by…water? who needs extra water?…I’m fine…I’m not resting—I’m framing the scene for my next magnificent composition, yeah, that’s what I’m doing…I’m breathing heavy? Oh, that—I’m just so excited to be communing with nature!…don’t mind us, you with your little point-and-shoot, you…).

Oh, and if you’d like to replicate my experience (and you really should), be sure to carry one bag with a 35mm camera and oh, say, 4-5 lenses (with 20 rolls of Fuji film, filters and batteries)—and don’t forget the Fuji G617 on a tripod!

Be sure to click on the photo to enlarge it in a new window.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fuji G617 archives: Dead Horse Point State Park

31 12 2010

One of my favorite parks in Utah—Dead Horse Point State Park, adjacent to Canyonlands National Park, 2000 feet above the Colorado River.

Be sure to click on the photo to enlarge it in a new window.

From www.wikipedia.org: The park is so named because of its use as a natural corral by cowboys in the 19th century. The “dead horse” part of the name is that the corral was abandoned, but the horses did not leave the corral, even after the gate was left open, and died there. The park covers 5,362 acres of high desert at an altitude of 5,900 feet.

I also just learned that the area was the final scene of the 1991 film, Thelma & Louise.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fuji G617 archives: Bryce Canyon

31 12 2010

Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah, photographed in the mid 90s (not sure exactly what year) with my Fuji G617 panoramic camera and Fuji RVP transparency film. The image height to width ratio is 3:1 and only four photographs can be made per 120 roll! The transparencies are 2.25″ x 6.5 inches long (6×17 cm). The angle of view with the fixed 105mm f/8 lens is about the same as my Nikon 24mm lens.

After my first trip (with my dad) to the Southwest, I was flipping through Joseph Meehan’s Panoramic Photography book and saw an image of Monument Valley shot with this camera. I knew then and there I had to have one, but certainly couldn’t afford the over $3,000 price tag for such a specialized camera. I found a brochure for one, tacked it over my computer, and vowed to work toward the lofty goal of acquiring one. I had wished fervently that someone would sell a used one. Voila!—a few weeks later one was advertised in the Washington Post for $1,900. The seller had used it just six times, photographing Little League group shots. It was in pristine condition and I was thrilled to become its second owner (he even reduced it to $1,800 just to reward me for my enthusiasm). I just saw one on eBay for that price and B&H Photo has a used one for $2,295.00. I’m happy to learn that this camera has held its value. Years later I was fortunate to meet Joseph Meehan at a photography seminar and had him autograph my copy of his book. Seeing these old images makes me want to go buy Fuji 120/220 transparency film (hmmm…how hard is that going to be to find in this digital age?) and lug my camera out to the great beyond!

Want to learn more about this attention-getting, shark-cage-surrounded, completely manual and mechanical film camera? Check out photographer Flemming Bo Jensen’s write-up on the Fuji G617 here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





From my 35mm slide archives: Monument Valley

19 05 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Big sky over Utah

13 12 2009

Photo notes: Nikon F5, Nikkor 24mm wide angle, Fuji Velvia slide film
35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Canyonlands from the air

13 12 2009

I shot this image during an aerial excursion that my friend Cammie and I took over Canyonlands National Park and Monument Valley years ago. Unfortunately, the plane trip got cut a little short due to lightning storms over Monument Valley (and yes, I was shooting that when it was happening!). I was disappointed the trip was ending thirty minutes earlier (meaning less photography time), but I think Cammie thought the plane ride was plenty long!
35mm slide scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Hallelujah light

12 12 2009

“Fingers of God” light (and a curtain of rain, I think!) over mountains near Aspen, Colorado (solo trip) and in sunset near Arches National Park, Utah (road trip with my friend Cammie). 35mm slides scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Lone gull, lone cloud, lone man

12 12 2009

Seagull on Chincoteague Island, Virginia; lone cloud somewhere in Colorado; and Dad during our road trip—Great Adventure #678—in 1990 (which he writes about in his recent blog posting, “Arizona apples & cheeseburger briefs” here). 35mm slides scanned by ScanCafe.com

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





From my 35mm slide archives: Southwest images

1 12 2009

After reading glowing reviews (by professional photographers, no less…and from my favorite graphic design guru, Chuck Green) about the scanning services of www.scancafe.com, I thought I’d give them a try. While I own a really nice Nikon Coolscan dedicated slide scanner, the thought of (eventually) scanning thousands of my old slides is daunting. I also wasn’t happy with the results I’ve been getting lately from random slide scans. Although it takes awhile to get the images scanned with this service (they outsource overseas), the price is phenomenal. I took advantage of their recent quicker turnaround and 25% off special this weekend and expect to have an online review of the images around the 18th of December. They return the slides with a DVD of the final scans. What’s really neat is—you can reject up to 50% of the images you send in. How they can profit from that, I don’t know, but it was enticement enough for me.

Photo 1: one of my favorite places in Arizona—Canyon de Chelly, in Chinle, Arizona. After a lengthy hike to the bottom of the canyon with my father, I photographed the White House Ruin (Photo 2). The White House Ruin was made famous (photographically) by Ansel Adams in his beautiful black and white image here.

Photo 3: Hovenweep National Monument, archeological site near the Utah-Colorado border. Remind me someday to tell you a funny story about how my dad and I discovered Hovenweep.

Photo 4: Kodachrome Basin State Park, near Cannonville, Utah. My cousin Bill and I stopped at this park on our Vegas-to-Lake-Powell adventure. How could I not stop at a park with the word “Kodachrome” in it? (Never mind that I shot almost exclusively with Fuji Velvia at the time!)

Photo 5: Petrified Forest National Park in the Painted Desert, Arizona. While we’re on the subject of the Petrified Forest, I just stumbled across an instant message discussion on AOL that I had with my dad after that road trip so many years ago.

Me: Remember how beautiful the light was when we visited Petrified Forest? Those stormy clouds coming in over the bright blue sky?

Dad: I remember it.

Me: And how you wanted to steal a piece of petrified wood but I told you that it wouldn’t look too swell for a U.S. Customs officer to get arrested for something like that?

Dad: So we bought some at the rip-off gift shop. Guess where they got ’em!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Way out (south)west

25 02 2008

Here is just a small sampling of some of my southwest photos, scanned from 35mm Fuij film slides. Images cover Kodachrome Basin State Park in Cannonville, Utah (http://www.utah.com/stateparks/kodachrome.htm); Saquaro National Park in Tucson, Arizona (http://www.nps.gov/sagu/); White Sands National Monument, New Mexico (http://www.nps.gov/whsa/); Canyon de Chelly (and the White House Ruins) in Chinle, Arizona (http://www.nps.gov/cach/), and San Xavier del Bac Mission in Tucson, Arizona (http://www.sanxaviermission.org/)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

southwest-series-1.jpg





Wide open spaces

24 02 2008

I’ve rediscovered my 35mm slides from my many Southwest road trips after getting the slide scanner hooked back up. Once upon a time, I shot with a Nikon N90 or my “newer” F5 and Fuji slide film exclusively (ISO 50 or 100). I remember those days… hundreds of dollars worth of film on each trip, hauling at least 20-30 rolls in a cumbersome bag, trips to and from the photo lab, film processing costs, culling at the light table (toss, keep, toss, keep, um…maybe), putting everything in PrintFile slide sheets, and filing into binders. (Lucy, you got some scanning to do!) I spend more time at the computer than in those days, but I wouldn’t trade the new technology for anything!

Here are two of my favorite sky shots. The one on the left was taken somewhere in Arizona or Utah. The other was taken at the Petrified Forest National Park (http://www.nps.gov/pefo/) in Arizona. The skies out there always mesmerize me; as a result, I have tons of shots of cloud-dominant images in my archives! Now that I’m shooting 100% digital, I need to get back out there to shoot it all again with different equipment.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

clouds-clouds.jpg