Wood anemone

25 06 2019

Wood anemone (Nikon D850, Nikkor 105mm micro)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Anemone Purple





White Prickly Poppy

22 03 2019

White Prickly Poppy (Argemone albiflora spp. texana) is also known as the bluestem prickly poppy or the Texas prickly poppy.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. (iPhone 8Plus with Camera+2 app in macro mode)

IMG_574728434





White Trillium

2 05 2015

Trillium bloom (Trillium grandiflorum)

Interesting fact: Trillium seeds are spread by ants, who are drawn to the small fruits produced by the plant. They eat the fruits and toss the seeds, which germinate where they fall.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

White Trillium lorez





Leaf-footed bug on Prickly pear cactus

1 05 2013

Leaf-footed bug, order Hemiptera (thanks, Brian K. Loflin, oh bug man!) on a Prickly pear cactus (Opuntia)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

BugOnPricklyPearCactus lorez





Prickly pear cactus bud (Opuntia)

1 05 2013

I was in San Antonio last week to photograph interior remodeling projects for a client, but got a chance on Monday to photograph wildflowers in bloom as well. My dad was an excellent day trip companion—driving me to and fro, holding my tri-grip diffuser to soften the Texas sunshine on my subjects, keeping an eye out for dangerous vermin (I learned that if you hear a rattlesnake, freeze until you can locate where the sound is coming from—do not run or jump), stopping at a yard sale (homeowner was actually named Porter Wagoner), treating me to lunch at Texas 46 Bar & Grill in the Hill Country, and crooning classic country songs from a 25 cent CD he picked up at a yard sale (Sonny James, Freddy Fender, Bobby Bare, anyone?) en route home. More to come…

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

PricklyPearBloom lorez





Fleabane daisies

14 05 2012

Thanks to my blog buddy and fellow photographer, Steve Schwartzman (Portraits of Wildflowers), I now know this is a type of Fleabane daisy. Each bloom is tiny—less than 1/2 inch in diameter.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Wake-robin

30 04 2012

Wake-robin (Trillium erectum), also known as Birthroot and Purple Trillium

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Yellow Trillium

30 04 2012

Yellow Trillium (Trillium luteum)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Carpenter bee on Turtlehead bloom

28 09 2011

The Turtlehead (Chelone obliqua) is a hardy herbaceous perennial wildflower in the Figwort family (Scrophulariaceae). The flowers are cross-pollinated primarily by bees and I can attest to that because this bank of blooms was swarming with very busy bees. The plant is aptly named because the flowers resemble the head of a turtle. In fact, the botanical name Chelone (rhymes with baloney, Dad) means “tortoise” in Greek. Photographed in the children’s garden at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, VA

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Knautia macedonica

4 06 2011

I think this might be the ‘Egyptian Rose’ cultivar, although the label at Green Spring Gardens didn’t identify it as such. Because it is closely related to the Scabiosa, it has been called Macedonian Scabious or Scarlet Pincushion Flower. This herbaceous perennial wildflower begins blooming in late spring and if deadheaded regularly, it can bloom until frost. Knautia prefers full sun but will bloom in light shade and may self-seed and naturalize.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Blooming in my garden: New England Aster

23 05 2011

New England Aster (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae), a hardy perennial native to the northeastern U.S.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Spiderwort

23 05 2011

Spiderwort (Tradescantia)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Wood Anemone

20 05 2011

The perennial Wood Anemone (Anemone quinquefolia) flowers in spring and summer and is from the Ranunculaceae family. Quinquefolia, from the Latin quinque, means “five,” and references the five petals of the flower. It is also called Mayflower, Windflower and Nightcaps. It does well in rich, moist soil in woodland and shade gardens.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





White Spiderwort

19 05 2011

I think this is the Tradescantia x andersoniana ‘Innocence’ cultivar.

Photographed at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Yellow Wild Indigo ‘Screaming Yellow’

19 05 2011

Yellow Wild Indigo ‘Screaming Yellow’ (Baptisia sphaerocarpa), sometimes called Horsefly-weed, is native to the south central U.S. This smooth, bushy perennial has elongated clusters of yellow pea-shaped flowers that bloom from May to September. Photographed at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Same time, last year

14 05 2011

On this same day in 2010, my White Spiderwort plants were in full bloom. They appear to be running behind this year, but I expect them to bloom sometime this month. This blog has been a great diary with which to compare what bloomed when in previous years. (P.S. I still don’t know if that was a tick or not!)

Originally posted May 13, 2010

White Spiderwort (Tradescantia x andersononia ‘Alba’). Insect identity unknown (actually, he looks suspiciously like a tick, but it could be a spider or a mite—your guess is as good as mine—this one was red with a black splotch on its back, and quite tiny). Two of them shimmied down the vertical leaf and onto the flower just as I was focusing on the stamens.

Spiderworts are very easy to grow—adapting to many types of soil (but preferring moist and well-drained) and tolerating full sun to full shade (can’t say that about many plants). I bought this plant at the annual Green Spring Gardens plant sale last year—and I plan on being there this Saturday for this year’s event!

(Update: Tomorrow is supposed to be their annual plant sale, but there is a forecast for much rain. Stay tuned!)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Canadian White Violet (Viola Canadensis)

11 05 2011

This herbaceous perennial wildflower, also known as Canadian Violet and Rugulose Violet, blooms in mid-spring and continues into early summer.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Woodland Phlox (again)

11 05 2011

I just noticed that the top left bloom only has four petals (instead of the usual five). Wonder if that’s a good luck sign? Woodland Phlox (Phlox divaricata), photographed at Green Spring Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Woodland Phlox

11 05 2011

Woodland Phlox (Phlox divaricata), also known as Wild Blue Phlox and Wild Sweet William, photographed at Green Spring Gardens. This herbaceous perennial wildflower blooms April-May in part sun to full shade, in zones 3 to 8.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved





Meadow Rue

26 04 2011

Meadow Rue (Thalictrum ichangense), photographed at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Entireleaf Indian Paintbrush or Texas Paintbrush

6 04 2011

Texas Paintbrush (Castilleja indivisa); Scrophulariaceae (Figwort family), photographed at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin, Texas

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Here’s your sign…

6 04 2011

Great sign posted at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin, Texas

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Large-flowered buttercup (Ranunculus macranthus)

6 04 2011

Correct identification: Large-flowered buttercup (thanks, Brian). The label near the plants reads, “Prairie Goldenrod,” which is another plant entirely!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Spiderwort

5 04 2011

Photographed at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin, Texas

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Spring in Texas: Bluebonnets!

28 03 2011

Photographed in Austin, Texas, 3.26.2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis)

6 08 2010

Lobelia cardinalis is a perennial herbaceous plant is often found in wet places such as stream banks and swamps. This Virginia native wildflower blooms in August and is pollinated by hummingbirds. Photographed at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Blue-Eyed Grass

16 05 2009

Photographed this afternoon at Green Spring Gardens—Blue-Eyed Grass (Sisyrinchium angustifolium) is actually not a true grass, but a member of the Iris family, closely related to the Wild Iris or Blue Flag. The plant is also known as Star Grass because of the shape of the flowers. This native perennial grows across the prairies and open meadows. They grow just 4-12″ tall and the leaves are about 1/4″ wide. The flowers are incredibly tiny—barely 1/2″ in diameter!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Blue Eyed Grass





Woodland wildflower

30 04 2009

I haven’t a clue as to what type of flower this is! Any takers? I photographed it in the Nature Trail and Wildflower Garden at the Huntsville Botanical Garden last week. And if you haven’t noticed, almost all the flowers I photographed at the garden have water drops on them. Nature was ready for me. Of course, I couldn’t have gotten any of these shots if my dear friend Sue hadn’t ran over to hold an umbrella over me each time it started sprinkling!

UPDATE: Thanks to Deb (Aunt Debbi’s Garden) for identifying this beauty first: “It is Spiderwort (Tradescantia) Beautiful flower with an ugly name.”

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

blueflowers1





Trout Lily

9 04 2009

Trout Lilies (Erythronium americanum) are a North American native perennial and can be found growing in damp, open woodlands. A member of the Lily family, this edible and medicinal plant is cultivated by seed or transplanting of the corm or bulb in fall. (From seed to bloom take up four to seven years and only plants that have two leaves will flower—and then they may not bloom every year! Now that would require more patience than I think possess!)

Tiny one inch flowers bloom from March to May and grow best in a deciduous woodland environment with filtered light in the spring. It is said to get its name from the speckled leaves, which mimic the speckled skin of a trout.

According to Stanwyn G. Shetler, Curator of Botany Emeritus at the National Musem of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution:

“the species spreads not only by seeds but also by offshoot runners from their corms, forming extensive clonal colonies, carpeting the forest. In one study the colonies were found to average nearly 140 years in age and were as old as 1300 years.”

You can read Shetler’s article, first published in the Bulletin of the Virginia Native Plant Society, at this link here.

Learn more about Trout Lilies in this article by Sarah Coulber for the Canadian Wildlife Federation at this link here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

troutlily







Blue Chicory

21 07 2008

Blue Chicory
It has made its way, on wind
far into the city, and it nods there,
on street corners, in what July wind
it slips garner. Since childhood
I have loved it, it is so violet-blue,
its root, its marrow, so interred,
prepared to suffer, impossible to move.
Weed, wildflower, grown waist-high
where it is no one’s responsibility
to mow, its blue-white
center frankly open
as an eye, it flaunts
its tender, living lingerie,
the purple hairs of its interior.
Women are weeds and weeds are women
I once heard a woman say.
Bloom where you are planted, said my mother.

Catherine Rankovic (reprinted with permission)

Learn more about Catherine here: http://www.catherinerankovic.com/

I photographed this tiny pastel-blue flower against a grand backdrop of sunny yellow sunflowers at McKee-Besher Wildlife Management Area in Poolesville, MD this past weekend. Here’s a map showing the location. Learn more about this wildflower’s history, growth habit and herbal use here.

Photograph © Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.