Someplace cool & green & shady

25 04 2012

I kind of like this ghostly-fern-glowy-greeny-magical-fairyland-shot so I thought I’d share it!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Lily-of-the-valley

25 04 2012

Lily-of-the-valley (Convallaria majalis)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Florida pinxter

25 04 2012

Rhododendron canescens (common name: Florida pinxter, Hoary azalea, Piedmont azalea); highly fragrant flowers bloom in spring, great shrub for full sun or part shade in a woodland garden, grows 15 ft. to 30 ft. in height and 3 ft. to 6 ft. in width

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Autumn fern (Dryopteris erythrosora)

24 04 2012

Autumn fern (Dryopteris erythrosora)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Re-post: Spring starflowers

25 03 2012

Originally posted 3.31.2009

These star-shaped, pale blue flowers with grass-like foliage are Spring starflowers (Ipheion uniflorum). This perennial is grown from bulbs and blooms in mid-spring for 3-5 weeks. Originating from Argentina and Uruguay, this plant naturalizes very swiftly, spreading by self-seeding and from bulb offsets. Often used in rock gardens and woodland gardens, they grow just 4-5 inches tall, and are perennials in Zones 6 to 7 (with mulching to protect from frost) and in Zones 8 to 9 without mulching. They can be grown in full sun to part shade, require medium watering, are low maintenance, and tolerate a wide range of soil types. They are blooming at Green Spring Gardens now.

I photographed these tiny blue flowers last year in mid-April at Green Spring Gardens. See how they look en masse here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

starflower2





Caressed by the sun

19 03 2012

A mass of Spring starflower (Ipheion uniflorum), photographed in the afternoon sunlight at Green Spring Gardens. A member of the Lily family, Spring starflower is a perennial that spreads 6-12 inches and thrives in zones 5+. Blooming in late winter or early spring in full sun to part shade, the flower color ranges from pale blue to white, depending on the amount of sun and other conditions. Good for rock gardens, beds, woodland gardens, borders and naturalizing; hardy and drought resistant

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





I haven’t a clue…

26 06 2011

I stumbled across this unusual plant in Brookside Gardens’ woodland garden area. The first identification that came to mind was “loosestrife.” I did a little research and can’t definitively identify it as a type of loosestrife. The plants have solid green leaves except where the flower is—every single plant had this extreme green and white variegation on the top two leaves below the bloom. I welcome any identification!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.