Will work for Peeps…

30 03 2010

(and Little Debbie Cosmic Brownies, too!). This past Sunday, Karen and I drove down to her lakehouse to paint the last remaining bedroom. While making a run to Family Dollar for paint rollers, we picked up some unhealthy snacks (bless her little heart). I told her I sure worked cheap—Peeps and Cosmic Brownies! To quote Steve Martin’s character in The Jerk, “And that’s all I need too. I don’t need one other thing, not one—I need this…and Peeps…and these Cosmic Brownies…but not one other thing…not one…oh, and this blue broom…

Without a doubt, it was plenty of sugar to keep us going. After we finished painting, I stretched out on the lakeside hammock for a few minutes just to get these graphic tree shots and also—because how often does one get to lie in a hammock, anyway?

Yes, Virginia, there is a Peeps Fan Club. Check it out here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Could Photoshop get any better?

26 03 2010

Thanks to F.T. for sending me this sneak preview of Photoshop CS5’s “content-aware fill” feature. I’m looking forward to this version!





Study of Summer Snowflakes

26 03 2010

I photographed Summer Snowflakes (Leucojum Aestivum) at Green Spring Gardens last year (see that posting here, along with a nifty photography tip!), and then planted a dozen bulbs in my own garden—and they’re now in bloom again here! I think they have a Calder-esque look to them, don’t you?—like little mobiles or elegant sculptures. I especially like the tension of all the converging leaf lines combined with the curving of the flowers—so graphic! Today was such a good and creative day (even after I had to put away the camera and get back to my paying design work!) Here’s wishing all my days could be like this one!

Addendum: Last year, when I was trying to identify them, I thought they were SnowDROPS. These are actually SnowFLAKES. The Snowflake is a taller flower that normally has more than one flower per stem. Snowflake petals are even and have green spots on each end. Snowdrops have helicopter-like petals and the green appears on the inner petals.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Your guess is as good as mine.

25 03 2010

No plant label on this beauty at Green Spring Gardens…so I’m stumped. Wanna hazard to guess what it is? It was in the woodland garden area and it was blooming in the shade. The blooms were small, too (maybe 1-1.5 inches), perched atop reddish-orange stems. I had to lie down on my side (in the mud, thank you very much) to photograph the downward-facing blooms. Oh, the things I do for you people!

😉

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Spring Beauty

25 03 2010

One of my favorite little spring flowers at Green Spring Gardens is Scilla siberica ‘Spring Beauty’—also known as Spring Beauty Scilla, Wood Squill or Siberian Squill (Liliaceae family). Tiny and delicate bright porcelain blue flowers grow on 4-6 inch stalks from bulbs in early spring in full sun to part shade. Tough and extremely cold hardy (Zones 2-8), this low-maintenance plant naturalizes easily by bulb offshoots and through self-seeding. Until this morning, I had never seen the underside of these shy, downward-facing blooms. The wind had flipped back a few blossoms, revealing their “faces.” I also photographed a white form, ‘Alba.’ Green Spring Gardens also grows a striped squill, Puschkinia libanotica. The website tulipworld.com states that although this striped form is hardly known, it is one of the best bulbs for beginners because it can be grown almost anywhere as long as there is proper drainage. And their price is right, too—40 bulbs for just $9.71—can’t beat that!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Striped crocus

25 03 2010

Photographed at Green Spring Gardens this morning. There’s just something punchy about the combination of orange and purple, isn’t there?

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





A new garden visitor

25 03 2010

I spotted this pretty girl (I assume it’s a girl because of the pink collar, but you just never know) walking across the shed roof outside my office window. In the glare of the morning light and without my glasses on, at first I thought it was our regular visitor and neighbor’s cat, Indy. We’re guessing she might belong to our new neighbors, but we’re not sure. Michael saw her on their front porch before she came to the back yard. I got closer and realized it wasn’t Indy. She stayed on the roof and approached me when I came up to her. I petted her once, then she began hissing, then she let me pet her again, then she hissed again. Testy little thing, she was. Ah well, she made a great photographic subject and she hung around on the shed roof for quite awhile.

CRITTER UPDATE: Unknown kitty has a home—she belongs to our new neighbors. I saw her and a dog peeking out the glass front door last night. Good to know she has a home! I sure wouldn’t let our cats out unattended—I’m much too fearful the call of the wild would whisk them away forever.

CRITTER UPDATE #2: Unknown kitty is now known…her name is “Foxy.” And that she most certainly is (she could improve her attitude, though).

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.